Join the #MITSloanExperts “Shaping the Future of Work” Twitter chat, September 20

Shaping the Future of Work, by Thomas Kochan

Professor Thomas Kochan, author of Shaping the Future of Work: A Handbook for Action and a New Social Contract, will discuss his new book that provides strategies for a new social contract to promote fair financial returns and good jobs for all, during a #MITSloanExperts Twitter chat on September 20th at 1 p.m. EDT.

Kochan, a longtime professor at MIT Sloan, will discuss his research and that of his co-author, Lee Dyer, Emeritus Professor of Human Resources at Cornell University’s ILR School, about the ways in which business, labor, education and government can create a viable social contract.

The host of the chat will be Steven Greenhouse, former labor reporter for the New York Times and author of The Big Squeeze: Tough Times for the American Worker.

Thomas Kochan is the George Maverick Bunker Professor of Managementa Professor of Work and Employment Research, and the Co-Director of the MIT Sloan Institute for Work and Employment Research at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He holds a BBA in personnel management as well as an MS and a Ph.D. in industrial relations from the University of Wisconsin.

Join us on Twitter on September 20 at 1 p.m. EDT and follow along using #MITSloanExperts, and potentially win a free copy of Kochan’s book.

A new social contract for work – Tom Kochan and Lee Dyer

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Kochan

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Kochan

From Boston Review

This Labor Day we could join those speaking out against Donald Trump’s many hypocrisies, chief among them the preposterous notion that he represents the American worker. We could point out that he is further dividing an already divided country, turning to Wall Street tycoons as his key economic advisors, advocating for the elimination of health insurance coverage for the poor in favor of tax cuts for the rich, rolling back overtime regulations, abandoning requirements that investment agents focus on the interests of the retirees that hire them, and appointing a Education Secretary who attacks public education, teachers, and their unions.

We could go on, but a better approach is to lay the foundation for what will need to be done in the post-Trump era, whenever that arrives, to repair the damage, regain the trust of workers, and unify employers, unions, government leaders, and all who share the responsibility for shaping the future of work. We can do so by laying out a positive vision and strategy built around a simple narrative: a new social contract for work capable of meeting the expectations and obligations that workers, employers, and society in general hold for work and employment.

A new and fresh approach is long overdue. It is now all too apparent that America is paying a severe penalty for failing to address several decades of growing income inequality and stagnant wages and deep social and political divisions between the winners and losers from globalization.

And things could get worse. If we don’t turn the digital revolution into an opportunity to increase the number of good new jobs it could offer, the gap between the haves and have-nots will grow. If we let this happen, the legacy we will leave for our children and grandchildren is a lower standing of living and the prospect of more violence.

The good news is thanks to innovations happening around the country we can see how a new and more inclusive social contract might be built.

Read More »

We Are One MIT, One Society, As We Pay Tribute To Officer Sean — Tom Kochan

MIT Sloan Prof. Thomas Kochan

From WBUR, Cognoscenti

Today, and in the days ahead, we will come together to give new meaning to President Rafael Reif’s call to be ‘One MIT.’ The many comments of students who had gotten to know Officer Sean Collier as a friend, peer, and respected professional are heart-warming and a tribute to him and to our community-of-one culture. By celebrating that as we grieve for Sean, his family, and for MIT we might just demonstrate the spirit of solidarity so badly needed in other parts of our society.Read More »