Tune into #TheSourceBook Twitter Chat on October 21 to learn how neuroscience can help you reach your full potential

 

Dr. Tara Swart, psychiatrist, neuroscientist, and senior lecturer at MIT Sloan School of Management will discuss her latest book, The Source, during the next #MITSloanExperts Twitter chat on October 21 at 12 p.m. ET. Our host, Kelly Hoey, will discuss with Dr. Swart how the ancient tools of manifestation and visualization, combined with the latest breakthroughs in neuroscience, can free us of self-limiting behaviors and propel us toward our truest, most authentic selves.

Dr. Swart will describe her own journey from skeptic to believer and share the scientific breakthroughs and personal revelations that changed her from an unhappy, close-minded, and disconnected woman wanting more from life, to a successful entrepreneur living with confidence, purpose, and joy.

Tune into #TheSourceBook Twitter chat on October 21 at 12 p.m. ET to discover a rigorous, proven toolkit for unlocking our minds—and reaching our fullest potential. Use #TheSourceBook and #MITSloanExperts to follow the conversation, ask questions and add your own insight. Make sure to follow @TaraSwart and @jkhoey!

Transportation apps: How SP and NY deal with impacts – Jason Jackson

Jason Jackson, Ford Career Development Assistant Professor in Political Economy and Urban Planning, MIT

From NEXO

Professor Jason Jackson spoke at the MIT Sloan Latin American conference, “The Future of Work,” held on August 29, 2019 in São Paulo, Brazil.

Transportation apps like Uber and Lyft are rapidly transforming the market into cities around the world. But there are still debates about the social costs and benefits of the digital mobility revolution.

On the plus side, these apps – including Grab in Singapore; Hello in India, Bolt (formerly Taxify), based in Estonia; and 99 in Brazil – made it convenient to move around cities, at least for those who can afford it. They also opened new income generating opportunities for potential drivers.

But these apps also raise numerous questions. For workers, there is no guarantee that they will receive a decent wage. This is important since in major cities such as São Paulo and New York, most drivers work full time. These professionals must also provide their own vehicle and are responsible for all costs. In addition, while it was thought that these apps could improve public transportation, especially the “last mile problem” in cities like New York, people using public transportation migrated to them, resulting in increased congestion and carbon emissions.

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Vertical literacy: reimagining the 21st-century university – Otto Scharmer

MIT Sloan Sr. Lecturer Otto Scharmer

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Otto Scharmer

From Medium

The Fridays For Future (FFF) climate strike by high school students may well be one of the most important, yet hardly covered stories by the US media today. During the week of March 15th alone, 1.6 million strikers were counted across 125 countries. This environmental movement to reduce carbon emissions was started by Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg in late 2018. In the meantime, a discussion has ensued among politicians in Germany about whether it is the right thing for students to take to the streets instead of the classroom on Fridays.

The principles below weigh in on this conversation from a bigger picture view: how to “update” the world’s educational system, particularly the university, to tackle the technological, environmental, and social disruptions of the 21st century. See figure 1.

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The internet of (wonderful and scary) things – Mohammad Jalali

Mohammad Jalali, MIT Sloan Research Scientist

From MIT Sloan Management Review 

How cybersecurity can affect the market for smart products.

Smart devices, once relegated to science fiction and our imaginations, are now ubiquitous. Today, there’s a market for everything from a Wi-Fi connected refrigerator to a voice-operated speakerthat doubles as a personal assistant. The internet of things (IoT) — the software-operated network of physical devices, appliances, vehicles — grows day by day as these devices become part of our daily lives. A March 2018 survey found that 22% of Americans used IoT appliances in their homes, and this trend is widespread across the globe. Amazon recently announced a plan to expand Amazon Echo services to Italy and Spain.

For consumers, the concept of easily operated, highly adaptable products is great. Smart devices are convenient, useful, and fun. However, many people remain skeptical or anxious about this level of connectivity. News of products leaking private information or being remotely hacked has led customers to fear for their personal safety and reconsider hooking up physical appliances to vulnerable networks.

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What the NBA gets wrong about lottery pick protections – Paul Michelman and Ben Shields

Paul Michelman, Editor-in-Chief, MIT Sloan Management Review

Ben Shields, Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management

Excerpt from MIT Sloan Management Review

In this episode, we take a closer look at the value of pick protections in the NBA draft — and how your favorite NBA just might be doing it all wrong. The NBA draft is all about value: Just a couple of selections higher or lower could be the difference between a franchise-altering superstar or another half-dozen seasons selecting in the lottery. But when it comes time to move these assets around, value sometimes gets thrown out of the window, and teams make deals involving pick protections they later regret. To help us understand why — and to chart a better strategy for pick protections — we speak with Ben Foster who presented his and Michael Binns’s research on valuing protections of NBA draft picks at the 2019 MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference.

Listen to the full podcast here.

Ben Shields is a Senior Lecturer in Managerial Communication at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Paul Michelman is the editor-in-chief of MIT Sloan Management Review.