The monetization promise and pitfalls of Pokemon Go–Catherine Tucker

 

MIT Sloan Professor Catherine Tucker

MIT Sloan Professor Catherine Tucker

From TechChrunch

Pokémon Go has been downloaded more than 100 million times since its July debut, making it the biggest-growing mobile game ever.

Naturally, the phenomenon has drawn much commentary about what this means for marketing, but I am more interested in what it teaches us about making money.

It’s not easy to make money in an ecosystem from unrelated parties. In spite of all the press purporting that Pokémon Go offers local businesses unique marketing opportunities, there are, in fact, many limitations. The claim is that small businesses can gain new customers from being a Pokémon “Gym” or “Pokéstop” — physical locations that players visit to collect rewards or battle virtual monsters.

Read More »

We Put Financial Advisers to the Test–and They Failed — Antoinette Schoar

MIT Sloan Prof. Antoinette Schoar

MIT Sloan Prof. Antoinette Schoar

From The Wall Street Journal

The world we live in asks us to make an abundance of financial decisions every day. These range from the inane, such as whether to risk a parking ticket when you stop for one minute to drop off your dry-cleaning; to the highly complex, such as which funds and investment products to pick for your retirement savings.

All of these decisions require risk-return tradeoffs. Unfortunately, while people have many opportunities in life to perfect their strategy concerning parking tickets, the same is not true for the complex and all-important decisions of how to invest retirement savings. By the time you learn whether a retirement strategy was the right choice, it is usually too late to change it.

Read More »

What Trump should do now that Andy Puzder withdrew his nomination for Secretary of Labor–Thomas Kochan

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Kochan

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Kochan

From Fortune

Now that President Trump’s pick for Secretary of Labor, CKE Restaurants CEO Andy Puzder, has withdrawn his nomination for U.S. Secretary of Labor, America will avoid, at least for the moment, a highly divisive debate over the future of U.S. employment and labor policy. This gives President Trump an opportunity to reconsider the type of person he wants to carry out his agenda.

Will Trump choose someone who respects the mission of the Labor Department, which is: “To foster, promote, and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers, and retirees of the United States; improve working conditions; advance opportunities for profitable employment; and assure work-related benefits and rights.”

Or, will he choose another candidate who will implement an agenda that weakens employment standards and enforcement; thwart efforts of women and men who are organizing to support low-wage workers, and deepen the divide between business and labor? If this is the direction of whoever gets confirmed Secretary of Labor, we will be revisiting last century’s labor battles and further divide the nation. Read More »

A conversation with Chris Knittel: Uber and racial discrimination

MIT Sloan Professor Christopher Knittel

MIT Sloan Professor Christopher Knittel

We hope you enjoy the latest installment of the MIT Sloan Expert Series

See the conversation recorded Feb. 15, 2017 with Chris Knittel, professor of applied economics at MIT Sloan, who talks about his latest research on racial bias in the sharing economy—how Uber and Lyft are failing black passengers and what to do about it.

Eva Millona, the Executive Director of the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition (MIRA) also appears on the program to discuss ways Uber and Lyft can work on mitigating discrimination.

 

#MITSloanExperts Twitter Chat: Ridesharing Services and Racial Discrimination

MIT Sloan Professor Christopher Knittel

MIT Sloan’s Christopher Knittel, Professor of Applied Economics, and associate editor of The American Economic Journal—Economic Policy, The Journal of Industrial Economics, and the Journal of Energy Markets, spoke with reporter and author Josh Levs during an #MITSloanExperts Twitter chat. During this chat, the men spoke about Professor Knittel’s research on racial discrimination in the ride sharing industry and discussed how ridesharing apps like Uber and Lyft can better contend with this issue.

Professor Knittel will continue this discussion on February 15th during a LiveStream event hosted by MIT Sloan. Read More »