Deborah Ancona — Occupy Wall Street: Where are the leaders?

MIT Sloan Prof. Deborah Ancona

MIT Sloan Prof. Deborah Ancona

From CBS News

The President of the United States, major news media, bloggers, bankers, stand-up comics, and people all around the world are shaking their heads and wondering what the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) protest is all about. Is it a display of leadership or anarchy, revolution or Sunday in the park? And the answer is, we just don’t know yet. This is a new form of drama that is just beginning to play itself out.

Many pundits argue that this is a leaderless protest. But this view of leadership is stuck in the old model of the single heroic leader in command and control mode. What we are witnessing is a different leadership model-distributed leadership. Here multiple leaders take on various leadership activities in an attempt to move toward the collective good. Read More »

Jackie Wilbur: MBA job offers back to pre-recession numbers

Despite the ongoing economic turmoil, the job numbers for our MBA class of 2011 are very strong. In fact, we’re back to the same offer rates we saw before the recession.

As of this writing, 94% of the class has an offer. This is up from 81% last year and closely matches the 93.4% we saw in 2006 and 92.7% in 2007. Similarly, on-campus recruiting opportunities were back to the same levels we saw in 2006 and have so far remained firm as we move into this academic year.

Read More »

Dean David Schmittlein–Government, Business and Academia for Jobs


From CNBC Squawk Box 8/31/11

The government should be smart and strategic about the type of spending it will do, says David Schmittlein, MIT Sloan School of Management dean, who says if the government spends on innovative enterprise in America, it can put those dollars to better use.

Kristin Forbes among five leaders sharing ideas for creating jobs and reforming taxes

MIT Sloan Prof. Kristin Forbes

From the Boston Globe

My top priority if I was in charge: fundamental tax reform for individuals as well as consumers. Get rid of all the numerous deductions, exemptions, and special deals so that you could dramatically lower marginal tax rates while raising as much (if not more) money.

This would make our economy more efficient – raising growth and creating jobs. It would reduce uncertainty about future taxes and help stabilize our debt, allowing companies to invest and hire. It would keep companies and jobs in the US rather than moving to other countries with lower tax rates.

Given our unsustainable deficits, we will need to do a major overhaul of our tax code at some point. It will be difficult to grow and recover until the uncertainty about how we deal with our fiscal challenges is resolved, so fundamental tax reform would help our economy both in the short and long term.

See the full article in Money & Careers

After the Debt Ceiling Debate and S & P's Credit Downgrade, Picking an Investment Adviser in an Unruly Market: S.P. Kothari

 

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From Dow Jones Marketwatch
S.P. Kothari, deputy dean at the MIT Sloan School of Management and a former Barclays fund manager, talks about what investors should look for in choosing an investment adviser to steer them through these turbulent markets.
What do you think?