Using System Dynamics to disrupt Nonprofits and help children in poverty – Chris Penny

From Africa-OnTheRise

Chris Penny, MIT EMBA 17

MIT Sloan’s mission is to develop innovative and principled leaders who will improve the world. This resonated with me, as I’ve always had a desire to help impoverished children, especially in the developing world. However, it wasn’t until I started this program that I was able to turn my good intentions into an actionable plan, much less a plan that might even disrupt the nonprofit world.

The key was utilizing the EMBA network, going to ‘see and assess,’ conducting small experiments, and learning from mistakes. In other words, I followed the MIT Sloan method for affecting change. Today, Broken Crayons has opened 15 businesses, which has positively impacted the lives of more than three dozen children in Ghana. Now, we’re scaling our approach to impact entire communities with plans to turn Broken Crayons into a self-sustaining organization.

Look for the root cause

The first step involved Systems Dynamics, which taught me to model the relationships in all parts of a system and how those relationships influence the behavior of the system over time. Applying this knowledge, I built models to identify the root cause of youths and poverty. The overarching question centered on how I could use simultaneous interventions to break the system of poverty.

Go see and assess

Another MIT principle is understanding the importance of observing the ecosystem you seek to impact. After connecting with a friend and former colleague Carl Dey, I decided to focus my efforts on the ecosystem of Ghana. The next step was going to ‘see and assess’ the ecosystem in Ghana. Read More »

The philanthropy data gap: measuring what matters – Tavneet Suri

MIT Sloan Associate Prof. Tavneet Suri

MIT Sloan Associate Prof. Tavneet Suri

From Financial Times

As philanthropy becomes a common source of finance for poverty-fighting programmes, it is natural for donors to want data about their impact on the people they want to help.

Yet measuring the benefits of philanthropy is surprisingly hard. How can we define and measure “income” in a village of subsistence farmers? Can we ask a street kid enrolled in a violence-prevention programme about his illegal activities? How do we know if a change in nutritional outcomes was the result of a social programme and not some other variable, like a change in food prices? How can we measure non-quantitative or non-monetary outcomes, like women’s empowerment or entrepreneurial motivation?

For many years, aid impact studies were based on anecdotal evidence or fragments of data. Over the past decade, searching for a more rigorous approach, development researchers have applied the “gold standard” of medical research: randomised controlled trials. In an RCT, researchers allocate an intervention, such as a microfinance loan, to a randomly selected test group of people and compare their outcomes with a control group. Read More »

Spender or Saver? The Choice May Not be Yours — Joshua Ackerman

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Joshua Ackerman

From WSJ Marketwatch

During a recession, why do some people spend money while others save?

Money issues can be grounds for conflict in relationships. One person may be a spender while the other is a saver. Throw in financial stress such as an economic recession and one person’s preference can seem completely irrational to the other.

How can people be so different when it comes to the “right” decisions? Recent research shows that our childhood economic environments have a lot to do with how we make financial decisions and handle financial risk later in life

Read the full post at Marketwatch

Joshua Ackerman is assistant professor of marketing at the MIT Sloan School of Management and co-author of “When the Economy Falters, Do People Spend or Save? Responses to Resource Scarcity Depend on Childhood Environments,” published in the Feb. 8 issue of Psychological Science.