Tune into #TheSourceBook Twitter Chat on October 21 to learn how neuroscience can help you reach your full potential

 

Dr. Tara Swart, psychiatrist, neuroscientist, and senior lecturer at MIT Sloan School of Management will discuss her latest book, The Source, during the next #MITSloanExperts Twitter chat on October 21 at 12 p.m. ET. Our host, Kelly Hoey, will discuss with Dr. Swart how the ancient tools of manifestation and visualization, combined with the latest breakthroughs in neuroscience, can free us of self-limiting behaviors and propel us toward our truest, most authentic selves.

Dr. Swart will describe her own journey from skeptic to believer and share the scientific breakthroughs and personal revelations that changed her from an unhappy, close-minded, and disconnected woman wanting more from life, to a successful entrepreneur living with confidence, purpose, and joy.

Tune into #TheSourceBook Twitter chat on October 21 at 12 p.m. ET to discover a rigorous, proven toolkit for unlocking our minds—and reaching our fullest potential. Use #TheSourceBook and #MITSloanExperts to follow the conversation, ask questions and add your own insight. Make sure to follow @TaraSwart and @jkhoey!

How to train your brain to make your dreams come true – Tara Swart

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer, Tara Swart

From the Daily Mail

As a successful doctor of psychiatry and neuroscience, it looked as if I had it all: I was married to a fellow psychiatrist and had a job working for the NHS. We were a carefree young couple, with a great social life and lots of opportunity to travel the world. Everyone assumed I was in complete control of my life.

But I was running on autopilot, and when I reached my mid-30s everything fell apart. I had become increasingly unhappy in my work, worn down by the long hours and workload and the sense of not being able to make a real difference to my patients.

I witnessed so much human suffering and saw how tough and cruel life was for the mentally vulnerable. I cared deeply about my patients, but I had a nagging sense that they deserved more than just medication and hospitalisation – that a healthier regime and a sense of wellbeing could do wonders to aid their recovery.

At the same time my marriage fell apart and it had a disastrous impact on my own sense of identity and confidence. I felt like I was drowning, with nothing to hold on to and no end in sight.

However, rock bottom gave me new clarity. It gave me a determination I had not known I possessed, and a feeling that I must progress on my own to fulfill my potential.

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The innovative brain — Maurizio Zollo

Image Credit: Flickr user Alejandro Tamayo via FastCompany

By Prof. Maurizio Zollo

Are entrepreneurs wired differently than managers? Are they better equipped to make decisions about risk and innovation?

I recently participated in an interdisciplinary collaboration between neuroscientists and management faculty in which we tackled these questions and found that entrepreneurs actually do use their brains in a different and more complete way when it comes to certain types of decisions. This was the first attempt to apply techniques from neuroscience to understand the differences in the ways actual managers and entrepreneurs use their brains to make decisions. Read More »

Evan Apfelbaum: The risks of ignoring race in the workplace

From CNN Opinion

Larry, one of the employees you supervise, hasn’t been performing his job up to expectations. But you’ve been reluctant to take him aside and speak with him candidly: Like most senior people in the company, you are white. What if Larry, who is black, takes your criticism the wrong way or, worse, thinks you are racist?

The last thing you want is for others to think your actions were influenced by race. So you’ve held off talking to him about performance issues that you’d likely have raised with your non-minority employees. You’re relieved that a potentially thorny situation was averted, even pleased with your capacity to be so racially sensitive.

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