Impressions of Seattle from an MBA trekker — Brittany Greenfield

Brittany Greenfield, MIT Sloan MBA '16

Brittany Greenfield, MIT Sloan MBA ’16

From GeekWire

When considering where to go on an MBA Technology Trek, Seattle was a no-brainer.

It wasn’t just that the city is home to some of the world’s leading technology companies, but Seattle has successfully created a technology innovation ecosystem — one that spawned many of the past few year’s largest tech IPOs. It is the philosophy of not resting on one’s laurels that has created longevity in Seattle’s companies, and provided important lessons for MBA students. My goal on a recent MIT Sloan Technology Trek was to understand the strategies, cultures, and goals that have propelled Seattle companies’ long-term success.

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Here’s what Seattle looks like to some MBA students on a high-tech field trip — Lakshmi Kannan

Lakshmi Kannan, MIT Sloan MBA '16

Lakshmi Kannan, MIT Sloan MBA ’16

From Daily Journal of Commerce

I recently joined 25 of my MIT classmates on an MIT Sloan Technology Trek to Seattle.

Technology is a hot area at MIT Sloan — 26 percent of the graduating class last year went into high technology jobs — so technology treks are very popular.

They are an important tool for students to learn about company cultures. However, we’re not just looking at how many hours we’ll work or how comfortable the lifestyle is. We want to feel like we’re making an impact on others in real ways, and we want to know that our MBA education is truly adding value at the organization.

Treks are a unique opportunity to ask questions and learn from employees, who are frequently alumni.

In addition to learning more about the roles of MBA grads, I also wanted to see if I could deal with Seattle’s climate. Growing up in India and living in New England for the last nine years, I knew that the Northwest would be quite different.

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Why MBAs should know a second language — Jackie Wilbur

Exec. Director for Undergraduate & Master's Programs Master's Programs

Exec. Director for Undergraduate and Master’s Programs Jackie Wilbur

‘Recruiters seek geographically flexible managers: global citizens who have an ability to adapt to new environments and who are able to build cross-cultural competence’

Recently, I had a meeting with a recruiter from a global firm about her company’s future hiring needs and how we, as a school of management, might sharpen our efforts to train students in particular areas. We covered all the usual topics. We talked about sectors, business units, and specialized skills. Interestingly, though, one of her greatest employment concerns had nothing to do with functions or industries; rather it involved geographic mobility, cultural awareness, and language skills.

She told me how her firm is rapidly opening offices around the globe, and how it’s looking for people who have experience in different regions, or who are willing and eager to relocate. “Most of the business will be conducted in English,” she told me, “but in order for someone to be successful and fulfilled they’ll need proficiency in the local language.”

In an increasingly global world, the ability to speak more than one language has clear practical advantages. More and more, though, fluency in another language is becoming a vital skill for the next generation of business leaders. At a time when American-based companies realize that their greatest potential markets are outside of the U.S., they are seeking geographically and culturally flexible managers. Those with an ability to adapt to new environments quickly and are able to build cross-cultural bridges will become the future leaders.

Language skills are paramount. As Matt Symonds, chief editor of MBA50.com, a website dedicated to the world’s outstanding business schools, wrote recently in Bloomberg Businessweek: “In a global business environment, [language] skills…make the difference between a good performance and a truly great one.”

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Our two “E’s” at MIT Sloan: Education and Entrepreneur — Miro Kazakoff

Miro Kazakoff, MBA 2011  Image credit: Upstart Business Journal

MIT Sloan Lecturer Miro Kazakoff, MBA ’11
Image credit: Upstart Business Journal

Though my memory might fail me, the first person I remember meeting at the MIT Sloan School of Management was fellow first-year MBA student Tom Rose. Though we’re both the kind of students that enjoy classroom learning, it was the exciting and creative environment outside of class that really motivated us to try to build something from scratch. That’s why we launched “The MBA Show,” a weekly live web show about MBA news.  We never asked permission, the two of us just started shooting it every week in front of a red curtain taped onto the cafeteria wall. At Sloan, you were able to just kind of do those things without asking permission. You had the space and the freedom to be able to develop ideas and operate like that without having to ask anyone first..

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MBA job trends: Students’ career interests continue to diversify — Susan Kline

While many graduating MBA students are still heading to traditional sectors like finance, consulting and technology, one of the biggest trends among top business schools is an increase in the diversity of students’ career interests. Perhaps it’s related to fallout from the financial crisis or even a generational trend, but more and more students are pursuing positions in a broader array of areas.

At MIT Sloan, about 60% of our MBA graduates in the past few years have gone to those traditional areas. Among our other MBA students, we are indeed seeing this trend toward diverse interests. Strong areas of focus for that group include: entrepreneurship; sustainability; energy; social enterprise; health care; operations and supply chain management; and entertainment, media and sports.

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