In the age of online shopping, don’t count out brick-and-mortar stores – Sharmila Chatterjee

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Sharmila Chatterjee

Sharmila C. Chatterjee, Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management

From USA Today

As the unofficial start to holiday shopping approaches, retail prognosticators are calling for a holly jolly season for e-commerce—and a less merry one for brick-and-mortar stores.

This year, for the first time, American consumers plan to do more of their holiday shopping online than in physical stores, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers. A Deloitte study predicts that customers will spend on average $879 online and $541 in shops.

Based on these forecasts, e-commerce appears in prime position to soon dominate the holiday retail landscape. We can kiss goodbye traditional stores. Right?

Not so fast. Brick-and-mortar stores are making a comeback. By focusing on customer service, integrated business models, and innovative partnerships, many chains — including Target, Kohl’s, Madewell and Best Buy — are likely to post strong holiday sales. Meanwhile, e-commerce may be in for a reckoning. Signs indicate that the lightning fast delivery speeds customers have come to expect from internet vendors, namely Amazon, are not sustainable.

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Viewpoint: holiday shopping was biggest in years, but not every retailer should celebrate – Sharmila Chatterjee

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Sharmila Chatterjee

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Sharmila Chatterjee

From Boston Business Journal 

The numbers are in and it’s official: The 2018 holiday shopping season was one of the strongest in years.

Total US retail sales jumped 5.1 percent this November and December from the previous year, according to data from Mastercard SpendingPulse, which tracks both online and in-store spending. American shoppers spent over $850 billion this season.

Not all retailers are rejoicing, however. While total sales were higher than years past, much of that growth is attributable to the rise of ecommerce. According to Mastercard, online sales rose 19 percent from 2017. Department stores, on the other hand, saw a 1 percent decline in sales from a year ago. This follows two years with growth below 2 percent.

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Brick-and-mortar retailers should nix deep discounts to make most of jittery shopping season–Sharmila C. Chatterjee

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Sharmila Chatterjee

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Sharmila Chatterjee

From The Conversation

Brick-and-mortar retailers have been on a bit of a roller coaster ride this holiday season as early expectations of strong consumer spending were weighed down by the uncertainty prompted by the election.

That’s on top of the usual jitters about the slow demise of Black Friday and more consumer cash gravitating to online retail.

That has made projections about this year’s holiday shopping season more of a guessing game than usual, but one aspect has now become clear: The rush by retailers to deeply discount merchandise will likely not prove to be beneficial to these retailers in the long term.

My research in “business to business” marketing suggests that instead of enacting ever-steeper price cuts that erode margins, both major retailers like Macy’s and small mom-and-pop stores would be much better off leveraging their physical presence as a source of strength rather than weakness by focusing on the personal touch that only they can provide.

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