The best retailers combine bricks and clicks — Richard Schmalensee

MIT Sloan Professor Richard Schmalensee

MIT Sloan Professor Richard Schmalensee

From Harvard Business Review

Retail profits are plummeting. Stores are closing. Malls are emptying. The depressing stories just keep coming. Reading the Macy’s, Nordstrom, and Target earnings announcements is about as uplifting as a tour of an intensive care unit. The Internet is apparently taking down yet another industry. Brick and mortar stores seem to be going the way of the yellow pages. Sure enough, the Census Bureau just released data showing that online retail sales surged 15.2 percent between the first quarter of 2015 and the first quarter of 2016.

But before you dump all of your retail stocks, there are more facts you should consider. Looking only at that 15.2 percent “surge” would be misleading. It was an increase was on a small base of 6.9 percent. Even when a tiny number grows by a large percentage terms, it is often still tiny.

More than 20 years after the internet was opened to commerce, the Census Bureau tells us that brick and mortar sales accounted for 92.3 percent of retail sales in the first quarter of 2016. Their data show that only 0.8 percent of retail sales shifted from offline to online between the beginning of 2015 and 2016.

So, despite all the talk about drone deliveries to your doorstep, all the retail execs expressing angst over consumers going online, and even a Presidential candidate exclaiming that Amazon has a “huge antitrust problem,” the Census data suggest that physical retail is thriving. Of course, the shuttered stores, depressed execs, and tanking stocks suggest otherwise. What’s the real story?

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Using optimization to improve bundle recommendations and pricing – Georgia Perakis

MIT Sloan Prof. Georgia Perakis

MIT Sloan Professor Georgia Perakis

From The Huffington Post

When you shop online, it is common for retailers to offer additional items in a bundle to try to increase sales. For instance, if you are buying towels, the seller may offer matching washcloths. Or if you are buying an airline ticket, you may be asked if you also want to purchase inflight Wifi and premium seating. If this “bundle” is appealing to you in terms of the items offered and the price, you might be motivated to buy it all. If not, the items or services are left on the table, eventually getting marked down even more.

With the online market projected to grow 57% from 2013 to 2018, retailers have the potential to significantly increase their profits through bundling. This strategy can be beneficial for customers too if they are presented with desirable items they otherwise may have missed — and at better prices. The key is creating an attractive enough bundle to incentivize the buyer to click “add to cart.”

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Student-run ‘SloanGear is a real company; this was not just a mathematical exercise’

 

There’s this notion that business school students tend to do a lot of talking, yet very little walking. But when I look back on my year as the Chief Marketing Officer of SloanGear – the only student-owned campus store in the country – I can honestly say that I applied what I learned in the classroom every day. SloanGear is a real company; this was not just a mathematical exercise, or Excel model or a case study. When we were buying the business, for instance, we had to come up with an enterprise valuation, which we figured out using a discounted cash flow model and other approaches we learned in finance and investment management classes. And in one of our marketing classes, we learned about how to use conjoint analysis to drive product innovation and as a company we implemented those methods.

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