The store as a showroom: having your cake and eating it too – Elaine Chen

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Elaine Chen

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Elaine Chen

From The Huffington Post

In 2005, I was shopping for an acoustic piano. Back then, piano shopping worked like this: Go to a showroom. Play every instrument. Pick one, and negotiate a price. Have it shipped to your house. Everyone understood that a piano store does not maintain much inventory on site.

Apparel shopping was completely different. Shoppers went to the store, tried things on, then paid and left with their purchase in a shopping bag.

The changing face of apparel retail

Fast forward to 2016. Piano shopping is still much the same, but apparel shopping has changed. While store sales still account for a majority of retail revenues, online sales for apparel has been growing explosively.

Nielsen found that in 2015, almost half of U.S. shoppers (41%) had bought clothes online in the last six months, and roughly 12% had made a mobile apparel purchase. Citing Morgan Stanley, Business Insider reported that Amazon has a 7% share of the apparel retail market, and will comprise a 19% of the market share by 2020. Another article cites a Cowen & Co. report which predicted that Amazon will overtake Macy’s by 2017.

Read More »

Duncan Simester on customer response: Why guess and get it wrong when you could do a little experimenting and get it right?

MIT Sloan Prof. Duncan Simester

The business pages are filled with examples of companies that have taken big hits to their brands because they’ve made marketing decisions that ran afoul of customer expectations. Take Netflix, and its aborted scheme to divide its streaming and DVD video offerings. Netflix could have avoided its embarrassing reversal if it had experimented on this decision before publically announcing the change.

Read More »

The big question for online advertisers: To personalize or not to personalize?

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Catherine Tucker

We use the Internet to research things all the time. Whether it’s a big purchase like a vacation or something smaller like a pair of running shoes, we often begin with a search for the topic online, eventually drilling down to find specific product reviews and details. But what happens when the pattern of websites we visit triggers personalized online ads that follow us around the Internet? If you’re later reading an unrelated article on a news site, will you really pay more attention to an ad for the specific hotel or pair of shoes you were looking at earlier?

The answer is: probably not. It turns out that when people are at the early stages of researching on the Internet — and haven’t likely developed strong product preferences — they respond better to generalized messages intended for a mass audience. Ads that are too specific aren’t going to convert

Read More »

How to improve products? Survey consumers with "active machine learning"

MIT Sloan Prof. John Hauser

When you buy a house, it would be irrational to search every possible house on the market. Instead, you narrow down your choices based on things like price, location, and number of bedrooms. The same thing happens when you buy a car. You might only look at sporty coupes or hybrid vehicles. Everyone has their own individual methods – or heuristic decision rules — for screening products, usually based on the item’s key features.

This presents a significant question for companies:  How do you determine what these decision rules are? Managers are increasingly interested in this topic as companies focus product development and marketing efforts to get consumers to consider their products or prevent them from rejecting the products without evaluation. If they better understood consumers’ heuristic decision rules, they could use this information in the design and marketing of new products.

Read More »

Why do Cambridge street vendors set up in remote locations?

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Juanjuan Zhang

On the streets of Cambridge, near the MIT campus, food trucks regularly set up shop selling lunch and snacks to hungry students, staff, and other passersby.

The trucks are mobile and can park in any legal, unoccupied spot. One might think the trucks would want to be where students congregate—perhaps near the MIT Great Dome at the engineering library—or where there is heavy foot traffic, like the Kendall Square subway station.

But while some food trucks do park at these high traffic or high visibility areas, others set up in more remote locations, such as the Technology Square or side streets near Memorial Drive.

Read More »