MIT Conference on the digital economy, London 2015 — Roberto Rigobon

MIT Sloan Professor Roberto Rigobon

MIT Sloan Professor Roberto Rigobon

MIT Sloan Professor Roberto Rigobon chats with Dave Vellante and Stu Miniman from theCube for the live pre-show to the MIT Conference on the Digital Economy: The Second Machine Age to discuss the Billion Prices Project.

MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/ide/
Billion Prices Project: http://bpp.mit.edu/

On April 10, 2015, the MIT Digital Economy Conference: The Second Machine Age, led by Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, and Andrew McAfee, co-director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, featured a series of discussions that highlight MIT’s role in both understanding and shaping our increasingly digital world.

Roberto Rigobon is the Society of Sloan Fellows Professor of Management and a Professor of Applied Economics at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

MIT Conference on the digital economy, London pre-show — Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

MIT Sloan’s Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee preview the MIT Conference on the Digital Economy: The Second Machine Age with Dave Vellante and Stu Miniman from theCube during the live pre-show.

MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/ide/

On April 10, 2015, the MIT Digital Economy Conference: The Second Machine Age, led by Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, and Andrew McAfee, co-director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, featured a series of discussions that highlight MIT’s role in both understanding and shaping our increasingly digital world.

Erik Brynjolfsson is the Schussel Family Professor of Management Science, a Professor of Information Technology, and the Director of the MIT Center for Digital Business at the MIT Sloan School of Management. 

Andrew McAfee is the Principal Research Scientist at the MIT Center for Digital Business.

The Editorial.com interview — Kristin Forbes

MIT Sloan Professor Kristin Forbes

MIT Sloan Professor Kristin Forbes

From TheEditorial.com

Interview by Heidi Legg

When we set out to find a visionary and thinker in the financial sector to add to our collection of interviews, Kristin Forbes’ name was suggested to us by other economists, as well as from other women her age in finance, the arts and by those equally formally educated, who have opted to stay at home and raise kids. It was one of the first times that such a varied range of people suggested someone to us.

We began to research her. We were intrigued that the Bank of England had selected this American economist to join their Monetary Policy Committee as one of two external members. And we were curious about hearing from someone who was in the White House during President Bush’s years, a controversial President, and who watched the collapse of the financial markets that has brought forth finger pointing and reform. But what interested us most was that this MIT Professor was one of the earliest thinkers to focus on financial contagions. I sat down with Kristin to discuss contagions, the current thinking on energy, inflation and economic growth.

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MIT Sloan CrowdChat: “Second Machine Age” chat with Andrew McAfee

Andrew McAfee, Co-Director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy

Andrew McAfee, MIT Sloan ’88, ’89, LGO ’90 and Co-Director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, fielded questions in a one-hour AMA-style (ask me anything) Q&A on the “Second Machine Age.” The online conversation was co-hosted by the upcoming Digital Economy Conference in London, where he and Erik Brynjolfsson of MIT Sloan will facilitate a series of discussions that highlight MIT’s role in both understanding and shaping our increasingly digital economy. The conference will be Live Streamed beginning at 6:30 am to 1 pm EDT, Friday, April 10. To watch be sure to bookmark this page.   Read More »

Opinion: How you can use earnings release dates to predict stock movements — Eric So

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Eric So

From MarketWatch

If you have good news, you want to rush to tell people about it. If you have bad news, you tend to stall, hoping it will go away or that some good news will come along to dilute it. Companies, it turns out, behave similarly — and therein lies an extraordinary opportunity that most investors have been missing.

I recently studied whether the announcements companies make when they reschedule earnings reports contain important information about the firms. This earnings season, for instance, investors may notice that Apple Inc.AAPL, -0.53%   moved forward its expected earnings announcement date to Oct. 20 from Oct. 28. Meanwhile, Coca-Cola Co. KO, -0.64%   has delayed its expected reporting date to Oct. 21 from Oct. 14.

What can investors predict from such behavior? Often, quite a lot.

When companies shift a scheduled reporting date, the announcement typically appears routine. Some financial reporting dates are set by regulation, but firms have discretion in scheduling earnings reports.

In this study, I analyzed the corporate reporting calendars of some 19,000 companies from 2006 through 2013. Wall Street Horizon, Inc., a firm that collects events information of publicly traded companies, provided the data.

I discovered that firms which moved up their reporting dates were considerably more likely to report higher earnings, while those that delayed their reporting dates tended to announce earnings declines. The stock values of the companies tracked closely with the earnings trends.

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