Greta, CEOs join Global GoalsCast to save the planet – John Sterman, Max Boykoff, Bradley Tusk, Laura Gitman, and Gillian Tett

John Sterman, Professor of Management and Director of MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan School of Management

From Global GoalsCast

Is the zeitgeist shifting toward action to curb global warming and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals? Veteran Financial Times journalist Gillian Tett joins Edie Lush and Claudia Romo Edelman to consider that question in the aftermath of the United Nation’s climate summit and General Assembly. While the actions of governments were disappointing, they see a new attitude among many businesses, who were far more engaged in UN activity this year. “The balance of risks in the eyes of many business executives have shifted,” says Tett. Many executives now think it is “riskier to stand on the sidelines and do nothing than to actually be involved in some of these social and climate change movements,” Tett reports. The challenge now is not whether to act but how. Edie completes her visit with Professor John Sterman at MIT, whose En-Roads computer model of the climate lets Edie identify policy actions that will hold contain heating of the atmosphere. “The conclusion here is it is, technically, still possible to limit expected warming to 1.5” degrees Celsius, Sterman concludes..

Listen to the full podcast at Global GoalsCast.

John D. Sterman is the Jay W. Forrester Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management and a Professor in the MIT Institute for Data, Systems, and Society. He is also the Director of the MIT System Dynamics Group and the MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative.

Maxwell T. Boykoff is an Associate Professor in the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Center for Science and Technology Policy Research at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Bradley Tusk is a venture capitalist and CEO and founder of Tusk Ventures.

Laura is a global expert on corporate sustainability, with two decades of experience in strategy consulting.

Gillian Tett is chair of the editorial board and editor-at-large, US of the Financial Times.

What the NBA gets wrong about lottery pick protections – Paul Michelman and Ben Shields

Paul Michelman, Editor-in-Chief, MIT Sloan Management Review

Ben Shields, Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management

Excerpt from MIT Sloan Management Review

In this episode, we take a closer look at the value of pick protections in the NBA draft — and how your favorite NBA just might be doing it all wrong. The NBA draft is all about value: Just a couple of selections higher or lower could be the difference between a franchise-altering superstar or another half-dozen seasons selecting in the lottery. But when it comes time to move these assets around, value sometimes gets thrown out of the window, and teams make deals involving pick protections they later regret. To help us understand why — and to chart a better strategy for pick protections — we speak with Ben Foster who presented his and Michael Binns’s research on valuing protections of NBA draft picks at the 2019 MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference.

Listen to the full podcast here.

Ben Shields is a Senior Lecturer in Managerial Communication at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Paul Michelman is the editor-in-chief of MIT Sloan Management Review.

 

Behold the Big Man – Ben Shields and Ivana Saric

Ben Shields, Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management

Excerpt from MIT Sloan Management Review

In the NBA’s modern era of pace and space, small ball, and chucking away from three, it feels like there’s no more place for the lumbering 7-foot center who used to be the backbone of the league. But the burgeoning field of defensive analytics shows that this “dinosaur” might not be going extinct just yet. Ben speaks with Ivana Saric, data scientist for the Philadelphia 76ers, about how defensive analytics are changing pro basketball and the roles of the people who play it.

Listen to the podcast at MIT Sloan Management Review.

Ben Shields is a Senior Lecturer in Managerial Communication at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Zero to IPO – Freddie Kerrest

Freddie Kerrest, MBA ‘09

Excerpt from MIT Sloan School of Management  

Angie Hicks of Angie’s List went from doorsteps to NASDAQ. Mark Zuckerberg turned his dorm room idea into a Silicon Valley corner office. A co-founder “blind date” between Julie Rice and Elizabeth Cutler sparked the cult-like following of Soul Cycle.

Sure, there were challenges (and legal battles) along the way, but happy endings came for these entrepreneurs — which make for easy fairytales to tell in glossy profiles and curated news sites.

Frederic Kerrest, MBA ’09, wants to change that with his newly launched podcast “Zero to IPO.” Read More »

Voices in AI – Episode 72: A Conversation with Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

From GigaOm

Episode 72 of Voices in AI features host Byron Reese and Irving Wladawsky-Berger discuss the complexity of the human brain, the possibility of AGI and its origins, the implications of AI in weapons, and where else AI has and could take us. Irving has a PhD in Physics from the University of Chicago, is a research affiliate with the MIT Sloan School of Management, he is a guest columnist for the Wall Street Journal and CIO Journal, he is an agent professor of the Imperial College of London, and he is a fellow for the Center for Global Enterprise.

Here is the podcast transcript:

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI, brought to you by GigaOm, and I’m Byron Reese. Today our guest is Irving Wladawsky-Berger. He is a bunch of things. He is a research affiliate with the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is a guest columnist for the Wall Street Journaland CIO Journal. He is an adjunct professor of the Imperial College of London. He is a fellow for the Center for Global Enterprise, and I think a whole lot more things. Welcome to the show, Irving.

Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Byron it’s a pleasure to be here with you.

So, that’s a lot of things you do. What do you spend most of your time doing?

Well, I spend most of my time these days either in MIT-oriented activities or writing my weekly columns, [which] take quite a bit of time. So, those two are a combination, and then, of course, doing activities like this – talking to you about AI and related topics.

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