What MIT can teach colleges about becoming an economic powerhouse — Thomas Allen and Rory O’Shea

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Allen

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Allen

MIT Sloan Visiting Asst. Professor Rory O'Shea

MIT Sloan Visiting Asst. Professor Rory O’Shea

From Bloomberg Businessweek

In 2011, two business school professors put numbers to an idea that many assumed true: that a vibrant research university can drive an economy. They studied companies started by alumni of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and found that those businesses had provided 1.7 million jobs and generated $1 trillion in revenue annually.

As more countries try to compete in the global economy, the pressure is on policy makers and university leaders to imitate the way MIT spurs innovation and economic growth. Unfortunately, many universities struggle to match the speed and success of MIT’s model.

Here are six ways colleges can transfer technology from the lab to the front lines of industry:

Start with stars. Universities with entrepreneurial ambitions need academic stars—researchers with big reputations and proven track records at getting grants. Not only do top scientists boost a school’s profile, they have industry contacts and instincts for spotting commercial opportunities.

Read the full post at Bloomberg Businessweek

Thomas J. Allen is the Howard W. Johnson Professor of Management, Emeritus and Professor of Organizations Studies at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Dr Rory O’Shea is a Visiting Assistant Professor in Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He also serves as a faculty member at the Smurfit Graduate School of Business, UCD.

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