Here’s proof that Wall Street regulators listen to you — Andrei Kirilenko

MIT Sloan Professor Andrei Kirilenko

MIT Sloan Professor Andrei Kirilenko

From MarketWatch

Especially concerning business regulations, critics argue, an inside the Beltway mentality prevails. Only the lobbyists and industry insiders are heard.

I am sensitive to this criticism. Five and half years ago, the United States experienced the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. In response to the crisis, Congress passed the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. One part of the legislation instructed a financial regulatory agency called the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) to write rules that regulate “swaps” — the same derivatives that had been implicated in the financial crisis. As the Chief Economist of the CFTC during 2010-2012, I helped with the rulemaking process.

After leaving the federal government in December 2012 to join MIT Sloan School of Management as a finance professor, I set out to study the work that I and other staff members had done on designing new Wall Street regulations.

My goal was to create a scientific tool to evaluate whether thousands of public comments that were delivered in response to the rules proposed by the CFTC were meaningfully taken into account. I wanted to study how responsive the government is to its constituents. Is the government really for the people?

Read More »

A better way to evaluate investments — Eric So

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Eric So

In the wake of the economic crisis, many companies these days seem to be undervalued. The current earnings-to-price ratios are high and often market commentators argue that these ratios reflect good opportunities to invest. However, the emergence of undervalued stocks comes at a time of high market uncertainty so it’s more important than ever for investors to identify strong investment opportunities based on a company’s fundamentals. Read More »

Dropping the Ball on Financial Regulation — Simon Johnson

 

MIT Sloan Prof. Simon Johnson

From the New York Times

With regard to financial reform, the outcome of the November election seems straightforward. At the presidential level, the too-big-to-fail banks bet heavily on Mitt Romney and lost; President Obama received relatively few contributions from the financial sector, in contrast to 2008. In Senate races, Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Sherrod Brown of Ohio demonstrated that it was possible to win not just without Wall Street money but against Wall Street money. Read More »

“Dark Pools” can improve price discovery in open exchanges — Haoxiang Zhu

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Haoxiang Zhu

When big investors want to execute trades but fear the size of the transaction could move the market, they often go to dark pools—alternative trading systems where orders are not publicly displayed. These opaque trading venues, now accounting for about 12 percent of equity trading volume in the United States, have sparked concern among regulators and in the financial press. With so many transactions occurring out of public view, critics warn that price discovery, the accurate determination of asset prices, will become more difficult. Read More »

From Data to Decisions: Lessons from Davos, 2012

We are at the beginning of the Big Data era, and there is widespread anticipation that this will be a huge benefit to companies. I’ve been attending the World Economic Forum in Davos and in my `Data to Decisions’ panel we heard CEOs tell how Big Data can reinvent everything from CRM to internal processes to product design.

We also heard that there are significant challenges in data sourcing, permission agreements, data quality and of course privacy concerns, as most Big Data is personal data about customers. Fortunately these challenges can be addressed by conventional business practices.

Read More »