Tune into #TheSourceBook Twitter Chat on October 21 to learn how neuroscience can help you reach your full potential

 

Dr. Tara Swart, psychiatrist, neuroscientist, and senior lecturer at MIT Sloan School of Management will discuss her latest book, The Source, during the next #MITSloanExperts Twitter chat on October 21 at 12 p.m. ET. Our host, Kelly Hoey, will discuss with Dr. Swart how the ancient tools of manifestation and visualization, combined with the latest breakthroughs in neuroscience, can free us of self-limiting behaviors and propel us toward our truest, most authentic selves.

Dr. Swart will describe her own journey from skeptic to believer and share the scientific breakthroughs and personal revelations that changed her from an unhappy, close-minded, and disconnected woman wanting more from life, to a successful entrepreneur living with confidence, purpose, and joy.

Tune into #TheSourceBook Twitter chat on October 21 at 12 p.m. ET to discover a rigorous, proven toolkit for unlocking our minds—and reaching our fullest potential. Use #TheSourceBook and #MITSloanExperts to follow the conversation, ask questions and add your own insight. Make sure to follow @TaraSwart and @jkhoey!

How to train your brain to make your dreams come true – Tara Swart

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer, Tara Swart

From the Daily Mail

As a successful doctor of psychiatry and neuroscience, it looked as if I had it all: I was married to a fellow psychiatrist and had a job working for the NHS. We were a carefree young couple, with a great social life and lots of opportunity to travel the world. Everyone assumed I was in complete control of my life.

But I was running on autopilot, and when I reached my mid-30s everything fell apart. I had become increasingly unhappy in my work, worn down by the long hours and workload and the sense of not being able to make a real difference to my patients.

I witnessed so much human suffering and saw how tough and cruel life was for the mentally vulnerable. I cared deeply about my patients, but I had a nagging sense that they deserved more than just medication and hospitalisation – that a healthier regime and a sense of wellbeing could do wonders to aid their recovery.

At the same time my marriage fell apart and it had a disastrous impact on my own sense of identity and confidence. I felt like I was drowning, with nothing to hold on to and no end in sight.

However, rock bottom gave me new clarity. It gave me a determination I had not known I possessed, and a feeling that I must progress on my own to fulfill my potential.

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3 simple habits that can protect your brain from cognitive decline – Tara Swart

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer, Tara Swart

From Fast Company

You might think that the impact of aging on the brain is something you can’t do much about. After all, isn’t it an inevitability?

To an extent, as we may not be able to rewind the clock and change our levels of higher education or intelligence (both factors that delay the onset of symptoms of aging). But adopting specific lifestyle behaviors–whether you’re in your thirties or late forties–can have a tangible effect on how well you age. Even in your fifties and beyond, activities like learning a new language or musical instrument, taking part in aerobic exercise, and developing meaningful social relationships can do wonders for your brain. There’s no question that when we compromise on looking after ourselves, our aging minds pick up the tab.

THE AGING PROCESS AND COGNITIVE DECLINE

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Legacy code and the other AI – Tara Swart

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer, Tara Swart

From Forbes

Have you heard of legacy code? In her article in the Financial Times, Lisa Pollack reveals how this has become a growing issue for businesses engaged in a process of modernizing their software and systems, with many large organizations and government departments’ websites relying on code headed for the “digital dustbin.” Archaic languages, such as Cobol, created 50 years ago, are a threat to progress not only for the direct and obvious inconvenience of them (Pollack describes how the Pentagon was relying on the use of eight-inch floppy disks to coordinate its intercontinental ballistic missiles and nuclear bombers, for example)  but also for all the indirect cascade of side effects that legacy code may trigger unpredictably in other parts of a system when you try to change or overwrite any part of it. To give an example, this could mean that a successful update, or overwriting, of some code for the purchasing part of a business within its ERP system may cause unpredictable and unexpected collateral damage elsewhere, as part of a complex technological butterfly effect that demonstrates the interconnectedness of all system. This is known as code fragility.

No department is an island, including yours

The article got me thinking again about my OPI model, and more generally about the complex ecosystem that’s at work in any business of any size. No department functions in isolation, and no department can be rebuilt or improved upon successfully if it is treated as an island.

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How to spot a successful team – Tara Swart

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Tara Swart

From Forbes

In this post, I’d like to return again to my Organizational Plasticity Index (OPI), introduced in my post “Why Business Is Like The Brain.” We’ve already expanded on one aspect of the model, and here, I’d like to explore another, synaptic connection, which equates to the systemic organization of the relationships and communication channels within a business.  The OPI model that compares businesses to the brain, using key aspects of brain function as a metaphor to help make sense of the healthy, or dysfunctional, running of a business. The model is useful because it helps me work with clients to identify the unseen “pathways” within their business that go beyond chain of command diagrams, workflow models, and mission statements. The OPI rating helps me to measure the long-term resilience of the businesses I work with.

The “synaptic connections” within a business relate to the way relationships function: both linear and lateral; hierarchical and “official” and informal. If I were to map these out, they would appear more like constellations or complex webs of connections than hierarchical family trees. The more closely I have studied these connection-maps, the more I became convinced that they mimic the similar lattices and asymmetrical cross-hatching of connections that appear between neurons in the brain. The similarity is uncanny.

At the moment, this complexity is compounded by the incoming and fast-evolving impact of AI on teams, and the fact that managers must now evolve to manage teams that marry AI and human roles and expertise. This requires a sophisticated combination of computational thinking and a manager’s most human qualities: emotional intelligence, intuition and creativity.

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