Apple expansion moves show how Silicon Valley is losing its grip on tech jobs – Lou Shipley

MIT Sloan Lecturer Lou Shipley

MIT Sloan Lecturer Lou Shipley

From MarketWatch 

Apple’s recent announcement that it’s building a new $1 billion campus in Austin, Tex. adds momentum to the trend among tech startups and investors to look beyond Silicon Valley to incubate and grow the next generation of innovative companies.

Moreover, in what amounts to doubling down on its satellite strategy, AppleAAPL, -1.06%  also said it will establish new sites in Seattle, San Diego, and Culver City, Calif., as well as expand in cities across the U.S., including Pittsburgh, New York, and Boulder, Colo. over the next three years — welcome economic boosts for those areas.

I’m not sounding the death knell for Silicon Valley. To be sure, this remarkable region south of San Francisco is still the brightest star in the global tech universe. Silicon Valley will remain Apple’s home base, as well as that of GoogleGOOGL, -1.23%  , Facebook FB, -0.01%  , Cisco Systems CSCO, +0.09%  , OracleORCL, -0.37%  , Intel INTC, -1.35%  and many others. Its position of dominance is not in jeopardy — yet.

Nonetheless, many of the tech startups planting their flag in Silicon Valley to be near angel investors, venture capitalists, investment banks, and tech talent are keeping only small teams there. They are increasingly utilizing less-costly satellite offices, remote co-working spaces, or other remote-work options for the majority of their employees.

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Where investors are missing startup opportunities in America – Joni Cobb and Joseph Hadzima

Joni Cobb, Founder and CEO of Pipeline; Joe Hadzima, Sr. Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management

From Entrepreneur

Venture capitalists and other startup investors regularly jet from coast to coast in search of the next big deal, routinely referring to everything in between as “flyover country.” While there has recently been more attention given to the heartland in terms of investing — such as AOL co-founder Steve Case’s new Rise of the Rest fund– there is still undeniably very little awareness of just how strong the entrepreneurial markets are in the middle of the country.

The entrepreneurial activity in the Midwest and Plains states — the middle of America, broadly speaking — may not be as concentrated as the mega-agglomeration economies of California’s Silicon Valley or Boston’s Route 128 region or New York’s quickly expanding borough clusters.

The activity is more spread out and it doesn’t hit you square in the face after leaving the airport, driving to and from appointments, past corporate parks adorned with the signs of famous tech companies and VC firms. But, it’s there in places like Kansas City, St. Louis, Omaha, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Indianapolis, Detroit, Cleveland and other cities with growing clusters of startups involved in a wide range of tech activities.

Some of the startups, like FarmMobile in Overland Park, Kan., are, unsurprisingly, focusing on technology tied to industries traditionally associated with the heartland, such as agriculture and manufacturing. In the case of FarmMobile, it’s developing products to store, share and sell agronomic and manufacturing machine data.

But, there are other young and dynamic companies involved with technologies that have little or nothing to do with agriculture and manufacturing, such as Kansas City’s Zoloz (previously known as EyeVerify), maker of identification management technology for mobile devices. It was the first U.S. company acquired by China’s Alibaba Group.

In America, entrepreneurs are increasingly starting to play to their respective region’s particular economic strengths. Read More »

From Airbnb to Uber: An MIT Sloan tour of Bay Area tech — Nilanjana Bhattacharyya

MIT Sloan MBA Candidate Nilanjana Bhattacharyya

MIT Sloan MBA Candidate Nilanjana Bhattacharyya

From Xconomy

I’ve always been curious about the West Coast, especially San Francisco and Silicon Valley. Growing up in India and then working in the oil & gas industry in Latin America and Texas, I didn’t have much opportunity (or reason) to visit the Bay Area.

Now that I’m an MBA student at MIT Sloan, I want to explore the tech sector as a possible career path. So when I heard about the annual “Tech Trek” to San Francisco and Silicon Valley, I jumped at the chance. Not only could I finally check out the West Coast, I also could check out tech companies – including several that don’t recruit on the MIT campus – and see if they might be a good fit for me.

Throughout the week, our group of 30 MBA students visited a mix of large and mid-sized companies in the hardware, software, and consulting areas. While they were all quite different, a common theme seemed to be an appreciation for being “scrappy.” In reality, some companies were scrappier than others, but it’s interesting that most tech companies embrace the concept of “all hands on deck” these days, especially since many have incredibly high valuations and in theory could afford an army of people in different functions.

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MIT MBA students tour Silicon Valley as tech campuses expand — Shany Alon

MIT Sloan MBA '16 Shany Alon

MIT Sloan MBA ’16, Shany Alon

From Xconomy

It’s easy to catch the technology bug. After all, tech companies are pretty much everywhere. I became hooked when I worked as an IT consultant at Accenture after college, and plan to work at a technology company after I finish my MBA. So when I had the opportunity to participate in a Technology Trek at MIT, I jumped at the chance of visiting some of the leading market players recognized globally for their entrepreneurial and technological innovation.

I was very curious about what it’s like to work at a larger technology company, especially big ones with more resources like Facebook and Google. What is their culture really like? What kind of impact can a recent MBA graduate make? During our Technology Trek last week with 27 other MIT Sloan MBA students, I was able to get some answers.

First up was Google’s Mountain View campus. I had never seen it before, and was taken by the size of campus, the people I met, and the general atmosphere. In addition to the famous Google bikes that employees use to get around, we also saw the Wellness Center complete with nap rooms, yoga studios, and a juice bar. During our tour, we learned that Google is opening new offices just a few miles away. It’s pretty big now, but soon it will double in size!

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MIT Sloan students meet Bay Area innovators tackling huge problems — Thomas Iljic

MIT Sloan Student Thomas Iljic

Thomas Iljic, MBA ’15

From Xconomy

I’d heard a lot about Silicon Valley, but had lived and worked in Europe and Asia until I came to MIT Sloan School of Management. Passionate about bringing new technologies to market, I wanted to do an MBA program in the U.S. because, more than anywhere else, this is where taking risk is valued as a driver of change. That seems to be especially true in Silicon Valley, and I was eager to see it for myself.

Organizing our Technology Club’s annual Tech Trek to Silicon Valley, I planned visits to a mixture of hardware and software companies. I also requested that we meet with people from different functions, including product management, which is an area many MIT Sloan students are interested in these days.

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