Voices in AI – Episode 72: A Conversation with Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

From GigaOm

Episode 72 of Voices in AI features host Byron Reese and Irving Wladawsky-Berger discuss the complexity of the human brain, the possibility of AGI and its origins, the implications of AI in weapons, and where else AI has and could take us. Irving has a PhD in Physics from the University of Chicago, is a research affiliate with the MIT Sloan School of Management, he is a guest columnist for the Wall Street Journal and CIO Journal, he is an agent professor of the Imperial College of London, and he is a fellow for the Center for Global Enterprise.

Here is the podcast transcript:

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI, brought to you by GigaOm, and I’m Byron Reese. Today our guest is Irving Wladawsky-Berger. He is a bunch of things. He is a research affiliate with the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is a guest columnist for the Wall Street Journaland CIO Journal. He is an adjunct professor of the Imperial College of London. He is a fellow for the Center for Global Enterprise, and I think a whole lot more things. Welcome to the show, Irving.

Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Byron it’s a pleasure to be here with you.

So, that’s a lot of things you do. What do you spend most of your time doing?

Well, I spend most of my time these days either in MIT-oriented activities or writing my weekly columns, [which] take quite a bit of time. So, those two are a combination, and then, of course, doing activities like this – talking to you about AI and related topics.

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#MITSloanExperts and #MITSMRChat: Sports Analytics, Basketball IQ, and Lessons for Leaders

Join us for a follow up conversation to MIT Sloan Management Review’s Counterpoints podcast with Ben Shields and Ben Alamar

Ben Shields

Ben Shields

How do you define basketball intelligence? Is basketball IQ a byproduct of the coach’s system or is it specific to the players? And the biggest question:

Would NBA teams make fewer draft mistakes if they measured basketball IQ?

Join us on Twitter Thursday, December 6th at 12pm ET for a follow up conversation to MIT Sloan Management Review’s Counterpoints podcast featuring Ben Shields (@BenRyanShields) and Paul Michelman (@pmichelman) and Counterpoints guest Ben Alamar (@BenCAlamar). Shields is a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Michelman is the editor in chief at MIT Sloan Management Review. Alamar is a sports analytics expert, the author of Sports Analytics: A Guide for Coaches, Managers, and Other Decision Makers, and the former director of sports analytics at ESPN.

Listen to the November 15th podcast episode where Ben Alamar will defend this hypothesis: NBA teams would make fewer draft mistakes if they measured basketball IQ.

Do you agree? Disagree? What questions do you have for them that they didn’t get to? Test your own basketball IQ during our conversation. We’ll be asking questions of the audience and want to hear from you. Jump on Twitter and follow along beginning at 12 pm on December 6th using #MITSloanExperts and #MITSMRchat.

About Counterpoints: Counterpoints is a new sports analytics podcast for sports professionals, data junkies, and fans alike. It’s a show for anyone who knows that numbers are about much more than the score. Hosts Ben Shields (MIT Sloan School of Management) and Paul Michelman (MIT Sloan Management Review) engage the world’s premier sports analytics experts in a lively, occasionally controversial, conversation about what’s really happening both on and off the field. Listen to a podcast preview here.

Business Books podcast: “adaptive” markets – Andrew Lo

MIT Sloan Professor Andrew Lo

From Financial Times

The adaptive markets theory is a “reframing of our view of financial markets”, says Andrew Lo, author of Adaptive Markets: Financial Evolution at the Speed of Thought.

In the fifth episode of the Business Books podcast, hear Lo, shortlisted for the Financial Times & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award, in conversation with John Authers, the FT’s senior investment commentator.

Rather than looking at markets as a mechanical system with laws of motion, Lo’s hypothesis takes the view that markets “are a human endeavour and as a result are subject more to laws of biology than physics”. What is the future for markets?

Read the full post and listen to the entire podcast at Financial Times.

Andrew W. Lo is the Charles E. and Susan T. Harris Professor, a Professor of Finance, and the Director of the Laboratory for Financial Engineering at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

MIT Sloan Experts Podcast: Uber, Lyft and Racial Bias

MIT Sloan Professor Christopher Knittel

We hope you enjoy the latest installment of the MIT Sloan Experts Podcast series!

The third in our series of MIT Sloan Experts podcasts features Chris Knittel, professor of applied economics at MIT Sloan, talking about his latest research on racial bias in the ride-sharing industry.

Knittel’s research focuses on how Uber and Lyft are failing black passengers and what to do about it. Listen to this brief podcast and find out how Knittel came to his conclusions, what his findings say about drivers who cancel on customers with names that generally indicate they are a person of color, and what takeaways Uber and Lyft can garner from these findings to improve.