Believe the IoT hype or perish: Equipping today’s graduates for tomorrow’s tech — Peter Hirst

MIT Sloan Executive Director of Executive Education Peter Hirst

MIT Sloan Executive Director of Executive Education Peter Hirst

From Wired

I recently attended the second annual Internet of Things World Forum in Chicago, IL. In the opening keynote presentation, Wim Elfrink, Cisco’s EVP of Industry Solutions and Chief Globalization Officer, referenced Gartner’s latest version of its“Hype Cycle,” noted that IoT (the Internet of Things) has climbed over the past year to its peak. Yet, on closer inspection, the enviable place IoT is enjoying within this technology-evolution framework is actually named the “peak of inflated expectations,” a precarious high point where individual dazzling success stories of early adopters and visionary speculation are outshining wider market reticence and slow early adoption. In the model, this magical time is usually followed by a “trough of disillusionment,” then — if the market responds favorably to second and third-generation tech — the “slope of enlightenment,” and finally — if wide market adoption takes place — a “plateau of productivity.”

The conference certainly provided many vivid illustrations of success and the potential of IoT, but will this fledgling industry make it through the inevitable coming trough, and climb “high and right” on the chart with predicted tens of billions of connected devices, as was enthusiastically espoused by Elfrink in his opening remarks?

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Executive education opens its doors to the non-English speaking world — Peter Hirst and Laura Ziukaite-Hansen

The vast majority of executive education and business leadership programs in the U.S., Europe, and even parts of Asia are conducted solely in English. But for a large portion of global employees—about 40%*—this can be a significant barrier to learning and professional development.

While English may be considered the dominant language of global business**, it is certainly not the only language in which business is conducted. New poles of economic growth are emerging around the world, and a growing number of non-English speaking entrepreneurs and managers are creating new and exciting businesses in developing markets. They want to learn how to manage global teams, scale their existing businesses, expand their product lines, and develop their workforces. If they do not speak English with enough fluency to participate in executive education, everyone misses out—executives in all corners of the world have a lot to gain from and contribute to global management programs.

This past winter, MIT Sloan Executive Education piloted the Global Executive Academy. Held on the business school campus, the two-week multi-lingual program brought together 38 executives from 15 countries to share a learning experience based on four of MIT Sloan’s most popular open-enrollment programs.

The Academy provided faculty-led programs focused on innovation, management, marketing, and organizational performance, all conducted in English and simultaneously translated—“United Nations style”—into Arabic, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.

Participants listened to translations using wireless headsets. All classroom discussions, presentation materials, and in-class videos were translated into the individual languages.

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Using technology to shape the future of executive education — Peter Hirst

There is growing interest in online programs as a way to expand the reach of executive education. However, that is balanced with our pedagogical philosophy at MIT Sloan, which involves high levels of engagement and interaction among faculty and students. A big question is: How do we keep that collaborative learning model in the context of an online program?

While there are many technologies to explore, we’re currently experimenting with one called AvayaLive™ Engage which offers an immersive online world in which participants interact in real time with avatars. We piloted it for executive education purposes last year by offering an online workshop for participants following an in-person program.  We learned a lot in terms of what was effective and what needed to be tweaked, but our big takeaway was that the platform provides a dynamic learning environment for participants. Read More »