Media bias and terrorism coverage – Neal Hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

From The Huffington Post

What’s in a word? More precisely, what’s in three words: “radical Islamic terrorist.”

These words seem to be imbued with a strange power. By not uttering them, according to various Republicans, President Obama is losing the war on terrorism. Obama, on his part, has declined to use the three words together, insisting that the United States can’t be perceived as at war with the religion of Islam.

And there’s little the media loves more than a war of words – even if this squabble over semantics has, in fact, very little to do with parsing out the reasons for the horrific attack on an Orlando gay club, which left 49 people dead. The shooter, Omar Mateen, did pledge himself to ISIS, but other aspects of his life point to a troubled mind and history of violence.

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A candidate scorecard – Neal Hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

From The Huffington Post

And it’s a wrap.  The two major conventions are over and we now begin the long slog toward Election Day in November.  As someone who studies both communication and leadership styles here at MIT, I think it is worth pausing and sifting through the sometimes overly loud and outsized rhetoric of the past two weeks to create a kind of scorecard.

The presidency is a job after all, an amazing and powerful one, but a job all the same.  So, it seems like a good idea to dispassionately assess the leadership and communication skills of the two candidates—not unlike what we would do if this were a job opening in a major corporation.

Donald Trump has shown his ability to manipulate the media and his facility with social media. He keeps his name in the headlines day in and day out, most recently inviting Russia’s Vladimir Putin to hack Hilary Clinton’s e-mails.   He also seems to have the facility to vacillate on positions without getting into a lot of trouble for doing that.  While many would accuse Trump of flip-flopping, one could suggest that he has developed this as an art or a skill. He’s done a good job of positioning himself as an outsider at a time when people have a great deal of anger towards Washington.

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The five keys to successfully negotiating your salary — Neal Hartman

neal-hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

From Forbes

Many people find asking to be paid more money awkward. How will your request be perceived? Will you look greedy or demanding? Are you sure you’re really worth what you’re asking for? The key to answering these questions and reaching a successful outcome is preparation. Fortunately, it’s not difficult to prepare for a salary negotiation. It just takes a few simple steps.

1. Think about timing.

The first step in preparing for a salary discussion is to consider timing. In general, it’s better to discuss salary after you receive a job offer rather than once you start a position. Companies generally expect there will be some negotiations before a person formally accepts a position, and assuming you have done your market research, you should be comfortable knowing the salary range and typical benefits for your position and in your location.

However, many people decide to have this conversation when they have been in a job for a time and desire a raise. If this is the case, look at whether you’ve had changes in job responsibilities. Have you taken on new roles or tasks? Or have you recently completed a successful project? If so, this would be an appropriate time to ask for an increase.

Another rule of thumb is that it’s better to ask for a raise when you’re happy in your job, versus feeling dissatisfied. You want to bring a positive attitude to the negotiating table, because that suggests you are committed to the company and are in for the long haul. After all, who wants to reward a disgruntled employee?

It’s also helpful to look at how the company is doing. If it just announced layoffs, don’t ask for a raise. On the other hand, it reported a 15% increase in profits over the last quarter, that is probably a better time.

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Trump’s rhetoric may topple adage that there’s no such thing as bad publicity — Neal Hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

From The Conversation

Is there such a thing as bad publicity?

Donald Trump’s campaign appears to be a test case in whether this old adage is true or not. His business interests are intricately linked to the Trump brand, which has been taking a hit as a result of his more extreme statements and proposals on the campaign trail.

At least in terms of political support, his comments have appeared only to improve his numbers. He’s dominated the polls since July, and repeated predictions that the latest remark would send his numbers tanking have all been wrong.

But how long can Trump continue to alienate and disparage various groups without harming his own brand and broader business deals?

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VW needs massive marketing campaign to regain consumer trust – and survive — Neal Hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

From The Conversation

Over the years, we’ve seen quite a few scandals in the automotive industry. However, the recent one at Volkswagen sets the bar at a whole new level. This isn’t your garden variety crisis involving a mechanical or safety issue.

While many of those (think Toyota and accelerator pedals) have been huge, the VW scandal involves years of deception to the public, and there are currently more questions than answers. It’s not unreasonable to ask if VW can survive this. In the weeks and months ahead, it faces a raft of questions that will greatly influence its fate.

Public trust

The company has recalled 11 million diesel cars worldwide, but what is the actual solution? The company will remove the software that cheated on emissions tests, but can it make the cars perform as promised during actual driving conditions? If not, how will it adjust its marketing message about those cars? As for the environment, what will it do about the revelation that those cars produced as much as 40 times the allowed amount of nitrogen oxide, a pollutant linked to asthma and other respiratory problems?

Other companies will have to address questions related to this crisis too. For example, automotive manufacturers of diesel cars face the prospect of random emissions audits to ensure they don’t have similarly deceptive software installed. Those companies are surely wondering if the public mistrust of VW is contagious and will spread to all diesel cars. If so, then the diesel industry could also experience fallout.

Perhaps the biggest question – and one that must be addressed head-on for the sake of long-term survival – is whether VW will be able to rebuild public trust. After all, the deception at VW apparently went on for six years. That is remarkable!

Everyone is now asking what happened. How could this level of deception have existed for so long, much less at a German company known for its attention to detail, skilled engineering and commitment to the environment?

Read the full post at The Conversation.

Neal Hartman is a Senior Lecturer in Managerial Communication at the MIT Sloan School of Management.