Why your diversity program may be helping women but not minorities (or vice versa) – Evan Apfelbaum

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Evan Apfelbaum

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Evan Apfelbaum

From Harvard Business Review

When it comes to issues of race, gender, and diversity in organizations, researchers have revealed the problems in ever more detail. We have found a lot less to say about what does work — what organizations can do to create the conditions in which stigmatized groups can reach their potential and succeed. That’s why my collaborators — Nicole Stephens at the Kellogg School of Management and Ray Reagans at MIT Sloan — and I decided to study what organizations can do to increase traditionally stigmatized groups’ performance and persistence, and curb the disproportionately high rates at which they leave jobs. Read More »

Why an MBA is conducive to launching a startup — Max Faingezicht

Why an MBA is conducive to launching a startup

A lot of discussion in the media recently has focused on whether or not entrepreneurs should spend valuable time and money pursuing an MBA degree versus gaining experience on the front lines of a startup. Some commentators such as Vivek Wadhwa even insist that an MBA subtracts from a candidate’s value. Read More »

MIT Sloan grad on the “sharing economy,” the next big trend in social commerce

Jaime Contreras MBA ’11 and Tal Snir MBA ’11

My first entrepreneurial venture in the so-called “sharing economy” happened accidentally. It was 2009, and I had just moved to Cambridge, MA to start at MIT Sloan. I brought my car with me because I was sure I would need it. As it turned out, the only time I used it was to go grocery shopping; mostly it sat idle. Word got around that I had a car, and I soon found myself fielding requests to borrow it from friends. One suggested I charge for the privilege.

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Erik Brynjolfsson: New e-book outlines promise and peril of digital revolution

MIT Sloan Prof. Erik Brynjolfsson

From Economics of Information Blog

Andy McAfee and I have just released a short e-book, Race Against the Machine. In it, we try to reconcile two important facts. 1) Technology continues to progress rapidly. In fact, the past decade has seen the fastest productivity growth since the 1960s, but 2) median wages and employment have both stagnated, leaving millions of people worse off than before. This presents a paradox: if technology and productivity are improving so much why are millions being left behind?

In the book, we document remarkable advances in digital technologies in particular. Innovations like IBM’s Watson, Google’s self-driving car, Apple’s Siri are turning science fiction into reality. Machines are doing more and more tasks that once only humans could do.

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