New models to predict recidivism could provide better way to deter repeat crime — Cynthia Rudin

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Cynthia Rudin

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Cynthia Rudin

From The Conversation 

In the US, a minority of individuals commit the majority of crimes. In fact, about two-thirds of released prisoners are arrested again within three years of getting out of jail.

This begs the question: is there a way to predict which prisoners are more likely to become repeat offenders?

Recidivism prediction is important because it has significant applications in terms of allocating social services, policy-making, sentencing, probation and bail. From judges to social workers, all parties involved need to be able to work together and understand the risk posed by various individuals. Read More »

MIT to pioneer science of innovation — Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

From The Wall Street Journal

“Innovation – identified by MIT economist and Nobel laureate Robert Solow as the driver of long-term, sustainable economic growth and prosperity – has been a hallmark of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since its inception.” Thus starts The MIT Innovation Initiative: Sustaining and Extending a Legacy of Innovation, the preliminary report of a yearlong effort to define the innovation needed to address some of the world’s most challenging problems. Released earlier this month, the report was developed by the MIT Innovation Initiative, launched a year ago by MIT President Rafael Reif.

I found the report quite interesting, both because I’ve been closely involved with innovation activities through a great part of my career, and because since 2005 I’ve been affiliated with MIT. Beyond MIT, the report should be of value to anyone interested in the growing importance of innovation to institutions, economies and societies around the world.

A decade ago I was part of the National Innovation Initiative, a major effort convened by the Council on Competitiveness to develop a U.S. innovation agenda. Its final report Innovate America: Thriving in a World of Challenge and Change, was released in December of 2004. The report did an excellent job in explaining the role innovation plays in U.S. competitiveness. It included more than 60 detailed recommendations in three major areas: talent, investment and infrastructure.

Read More »

How to tackle America’s physician shortage — Barbara Dyer

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer and Visiting Scientist Barbara Dyer

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer and Visiting Scientist Barbara Dyer

From Fortune

Since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted in 2010, 16.4 million Americans have entered the healthcare system. This record number of insured individuals applies tremendous pressure on an already stretched system, but it also creates opportunities for innovation. The population of newly insured patients includes many who are living close to the poverty line. The rate of low-wealth Americans who are now insured increased by 13% while a Gallup poll found that low-wealth Americans were more likely to struggle with chronic conditions such as diabetes, obesity, depression, and high blood pressure.

In order to effectively meet the increased patient load, health centers must be prepared to manage the influx of new patients efficiently and cost-effectively. Complicating this is the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) finding that the U.S. is headed towards a “doctor shortage.” The AAMC estimates that total physician demand will grow by up to 17%, which translates into a shortage of more than 31,000 primary care doctors and up to 63,700 other physicians by 2025.  Read More »

Keystone Pipeline Foes Should Face Reality — Chris Knittel

MIT Sloan Prof. Christopher Knittel

From Bloomberg

Opponents of the Keystone XL oil pipeline warn of its potentially catastrophic consequences. Building it, climate scientist James Hansen says, would mean “game over” for the climate.

New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman hopes that, if it’s given a green light, “Bill McKibben and his coalition go crazy.” And he means “chain-themselves-to-the-White-House-fence-stop-traffic-at-the-Capitol kind of crazy.”

Are they all just crying wolf and using Keystone XL as a proxy battle against oil?

I hope so, because the economics behind laying a pipeline from Alberta, Canada, to the U.S. Gulf Coast would make it difficult for the pipeline to have any effect on greenhouse-gas emissions. I trust that if opponents dug a little deeper into the issues and the market for oil, they would agree — at least privately.

Three things would need to be true for Keystone to lead to more emissions. Otherwise, the pipeline could actually reduce them. Read More »

MIT Conference on the digital economy, London post-show — Aliza Blachman O’Keeffe

Aliza Blackman O'Keeffe, MIT Sloan MBA '90

Aliza Blackman O’Keeffe, MIT Sloan MBA ’90

MIT Sloan alumna Aliza Blachman O’Keeffe, SM ’90, and chair of the alumni board, sits down with Dave Vellante and Stu Miniman from theCube for the live post-show to the MIT Conference on the Digital Economy: The Second Machine Age. O’Keeffe discusses the purpose of the MIT Sloan Alumni Board and how its members are using technology and innovation to reach a global alumni base.

MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy:
MIT Sloan Alumni Board:…

On April 10, 2015, the MIT Digital Economy Conference: The Second Machine Age, led by Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, and Andrew McAfee, co-director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, featured a series of discussions that highlight MIT’s role in both understanding and shaping our increasingly digital world.

Aliza Blachman O’Keeffe, MBA ’90, is chair of the alumni board.