MIT fuses design and management with new master track — Matthew Kressy

Matt Kressy, Director, Integrated Design and Management master’s degree track

From Business Because

When you launch a new master’s degree track at a place like MIT, you get asked a lot of questions. The most common ones I get are: what do you want students to get out of the Integrated Design & Management (IDM) program? How did it get started? How does it work? And what kinds of students are you looking for?

I want to give designers a voice. Traditionally, designers are not well versed in the languages of engineering and business. They’re great at inventing and creating, but they’re generally not good at explaining how those creations could be profitable or feasible. As a result, business and engineering decisions get made without the benefit of design sensibilities and insights.

I want to empower designers to speak up and provide them with the management tools to more effectively communicate their vision. My hope is that this program helps designers demonstrate that great design can be a competitive advantage.

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To Manage a Successful Sports Team, Focus on Data — Ben Shields

MIT Sloan Lecturer Ben Shields

From Xconomy

The mantra of youth sports where “everyone gets a trophy” is permeating professional leagues. These days every team can claim some semblance of winning. In the bygone era of the NFL, two teams made the playoffs and that consisted of one game, the Super Bowl. Today six teams from each conference advance, and there is talk of adding more. In MLB, it used to be that the league leaders won the pennant and then went to the World Series; now, five teams in each league make the playoffs. In the NBA and the NHL, meanwhile, more than half of all teams make the post-season.

As the definition of post-season success broadens and winning becomes a commodity, a team’s performance isn’t enough to stand out in the $750 billion sports industry. And at a time where traditional revenue streams are under pressure and the competition for money, media, and sponsors remains stiff, sports organizations have to be more innovative.

So, what should they be doing to drive revenue? How can they use technology to attract and interact with fans? And, in the Age of Big Data, what’s the best use of analytics to increase ticket sales? These are some of the questions on the table at the 2015 MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference.

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Using big data to manage medical expectations — Cynthia Rudin

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Cynthia Rudin

From The Health Care Blog 

For all the advances in both medicine and technology, patients still face a bewildering array of advice and information when trying to weigh the possible consequences of certain medical treatments. But a hands-on, data-driven tool I have developed with some colleagues can now help patients obtain personalized predictions for their recovery from surgery. This tool can help patients better manage their expectations about their speed of recovery and long-term effects of the procedure.

People need to be able to fully understand the possible effects of a medical procedure in a realistic and clear way. Seeking to develop a model for recovery curves, we developed a Bayesian modeling approach to recovery curve prediction in order to forecast sexual function levels after prostatectomy, based on the experiences of 300 UCLA clinic patients both before radical prostatectomy surgery and during the four years immediately following surgery. The resulting interactive tool is designed to be used before the patient has a prostatectomy in order to help the patient manage expectations. A central predicted recovery curve shows the patient’s average sexual function over time after the surgery. The tool also displays a range of lighter-colored curves illustrating the broader range of possible outcomes.

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Taking a wait-and-see approach with disruptive innovations — Matt Marx

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Matt Marx

From TechCrunch

There’s been quite the brouhaha lately about disruptive innovation. On one side is Harvard Prof. Clay Christensen (author of The Innovator’s Dilemma) and his long-prevailing theory about how disruptive innovation drives incumbents out of the market. On the other side is Jill Lepore and her attack of Christensen’s theory in The New Yorker. It’s an interesting issue: Do disruptive innovations almost always lead to the downfall of incumbent companies? Is their only hope to “disrupt” themselves?

Along with Joshua Gans of the University of Toronto and David Hsu of Wharton, I conducted a study on the speech recognition industry over the last 58 years. We found a surprising pattern among entrants that adopted disruptive technologies: Instead of always going head-to-head with incumbents, they often adopted a dynamic commercialization strategy in which they started out competing against them, but later switched to cooperating with them (e.g. by licensing their technology). To understand how this can happen, we need to review what it means for a technology to be “disruptive.”

What MIT can teach colleges about becoming an economic powerhouse — Thomas Allen and Rory O’Shea

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Allen

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Allen

MIT Sloan Visiting Asst. Professor Rory O'Shea

MIT Sloan Visiting Asst. Professor Rory O’Shea

From Bloomberg Businessweek

In 2011, two business school professors put numbers to an idea that many assumed true: that a vibrant research university can drive an economy. They studied companies started by alumni of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and found that those businesses had provided 1.7 million jobs and generated $1 trillion in revenue annually.

As more countries try to compete in the global economy, the pressure is on policy makers and university leaders to imitate the way MIT spurs innovation and economic growth. Unfortunately, many universities struggle to match the speed and success of MIT’s model.

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