How Ghana plans to finance the sustainable development goals – Meghan McCormick

Meghan McCormick, Alumna, MIT Sloan School of Management

From Forbes

“Macro indicators show good performance, but below the surface, there are economic and social issues that threaten the cohesion of Ghanaian society.” With these words of both optimism and caution, Hamdiya Ismailia, the General Manager of the Venture Capital Trust Fund and Chair of Impact Investing Ghana (IIGh) debuted IIGh to a room full of stakeholders in Ecobank Ghana’s brand-new auditorium.

Impact Investing itself lives in a world of contradictions trying to resolve themselves. “Impact investing is not philanthropy. We have moved past that,” said Ismailia. This is the central tension in impact investing. You invest to create social and environmental impact, but you also expect returns. It is an industry that is not just trying to prove that you can have your cake and eat it too, but that if you don’t, eventually there will be no cake left for anyone.

This renewed push for impact investing in Ghana specifically, and more broadly around the world, comes out of necessity. According to Sylvia Lopez-Ekra, the UN Resident Coordinator for Ghana, $5 to 7 trillion are needed each year to implement the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs are a bold collection of 17 goals set by the UN General Assembly in 2015 to be achieved by 2030. Like the Millennium Development Goals that came before them, they include such stretch goals as ‘No Poverty’ and ‘Gender Equality’. It will take an equally bold combination of innovation in policy, implementation, and financing to achieve them.

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Uncle Sam needs fresh strategy to manage federal lending programs – Doug Criscitello

Doug Criscitello, Executive Director of MIT’s Center for Finance and Policy

MIT Sloan Executive Director of MIT’s Center for Finance and Policy, Doug Criscitello

From The Hill

The United States government today is one of the largest consumer lending institutions in the world. Its expansive loan portfolio has been growing for years with little attention given to designing a coordinated approach for administering its lending activities. With a credit portfolio now exceeding $4 trillion and comprising more than 100 loan programs dispersed across 20 or so federal agencies, the government must take a serious look at how it plans for and operates its many credit programs.

The United States spends about $3 billion a year managing its portfolio of loans. It is hard to imagine a more disparate jumble of agencies that now make loans to home buyers, college students, small business owners, and various other borrowers. The government and its citizens would benefit significantly from taking a more coordinated approach. The creation of a single credit entity that consolidates the credit actions performed by the various agencies doing the job today would result in significant savings relative to the current approach. It would also realize some significant efficiencies to improve outcomes for borrowers and the government.

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Join the #MITSloanBrazil Twitter Chat on the “Future of Work: The Effects of AI, Automation, and the Changing Economy” on August 21

The digital age is impacting all aspects of life, including the future of work. Technological innovations have the potential to transform the workplace and enhance productivity, but it will take proactive and thoughtful discussion to harness these innovations for social benefit.

To explore this further, MIT Sloan Experts is hosting the #MITSloanBrazil Twitter chat on August 21 at 9 a.m. ET (10 a.m. São Paulo) to discuss the topics and themes of the upcoming Future of Work Conference in Brazil.

The conference, which will bring together leading experts from business and academia, aims to highlight the ways in which artificial intelligence, automation and the changing economy are affecting the future of work. This issue is crucial in Brazil, where 12 percent of the country’s workforce is unemployed.

The Twitter chat on August 21 will be hosted by Gabriel Azevedo (@gabrielazevedo), Professor of Constitutional Law, Head of Institutional Relations & Public Policy at Jusbrasil and Councilman in Belo Horizonte. He will be asking questions about the Future of Work and the upcoming conference to Lee Ullmann (@MITSloanLatAm), Director of the MIT Sloan Latin America Office, Jason Jackson (@JasonBJackson), Assistant Professor of Political Economy and Urban Planning at MIT, and Fernando Shayer (@CaminoEducation), CEO of Camino Education.

Join us on Twitter on August 21 at 9 a.m. ET (10 a.m. São Paulo) and follow along using the hashtag #MITSloanBrazil. Your comments and questions are encouraged! Simply include #MITSloanBrazil in your Tweets.

Advice on climate policy for the 2020 presidential candidates – Henry Jacoby, Richard Richels, and Gary Yohe

Henry D. Jacoby, Professor Emeritus, MIT Sloan School of Management

Gary Yohe, Huffington Foundation Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies, Wesleyan University

Richard Richels, directed climate change research at the Electric Power Research Institute.

From The Hill

The Paris Agreement, with its goal of halting global warming short of 2 degree Celsius, conjures up an image of a temperature threshold which we dare not exceed, akin to Thelma and Louise knowingly and recklessly driving over a cliff to their ruin.

For that hapless couple, there may have been a sudden abyss that they chose to breach. But in the case of global warming, a better metaphor might be that of the can that gets kicked down a road that becomes increasingly treacherous with every mile travelled. Due to our past reluctance to apply the brakes, the can is now farther down the road, and it is going faster than we realize.

The science is clear. When we include the pent-up momentum of the climate system, we have already committed to warming of at least 1.5 degree C. Moreover, with the additional heating that will occur as we reduce emissions to zero, a 2-degree limit is also in doubt.

Have no illusions. The case for coordinated action both nationally and internationally is compelling, even if the articulated temperature targets turn out to be only aspirational. The intensity of the wildfires in the West, the unrelenting flooding in the midsection of the country and the fury of hurricanes striking our coastlines are but a preview of what’s to come—just like the recognition of increases in the frequency of heatwaves and the severity of droughts.

It doesn’t take a genius to see the absurdity of inaction in the face of these risks. Continuing to kick the can down the road will place an intolerable burden on future generations.

But all the news is not bad. Recent polls suggest that we may be entering a new era of public concern over climate change. The number of Americans witnessing the growing destruction has risen. Many see it out of their kitchen windows; all observe it on the evening news.

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A study of more than 250 platforms reveals why most fail – Michael A. Cusumano, David B. Yoffie, and Annabelle Gawer

Michael Cusumano, SMR Distinguished Professor of Management, MIT Sloan School of Management

From Harvard Business Review 

Platforms have become one of the most important business models of the 21st century. In our newly-published book, we divide all platforms into two types:  Innovation platforms enable third-party firms to add complementary products and services to a core product or technology. Prominent examples include Google Android and Apple iPhone operating systems as well as Amazon Web Services. The other type, transaction platforms, enable the exchange of information, goods, or services. Examples include Amazon Marketplace, Airbnb, or Uber.

Five of the six most valuable firms in the world are built around these types of platforms.  In our analysis of data going back 20 years, we also identified 43 publicly-listed platform companies in the Forbes Global 2000. These platforms generated the same level of annual revenues (about $4.5 billion) as their non-platform counterparts, but used half the number of employees. They also had twice the operating profits and much higher market values and growth rates.

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