Brady, Patriots & NFL come out on top — Ben Shields

MIT Sloan Lecturer Ben Shields

MIT Sloan Lecturer Ben Shields

From USA TODAY

It may seem unlikely today, but when all is said and done with Deflategate and Tom Brady returns to the field, the Patriots, the NFL and even Brady all stand to emerge as winners in business over the long-term.

To be sure, the Deflategate crisis has been fraught with controversial questions. Was the “more probable than not” evidence cited in the Wells Report strong enough to convict Tom Brady? If so, what is a reasonable punishment?  How serious of an offense is deflating footballs? How should Brady’s cooperation (or alleged lack thereof) in the investigation, including the recent revelation of his destroyed cell phone, factor into the punishment and appeal process?  Fans and the media have been deliberating these and other issues with the same fervor as ranking the greatest quarterbacks of all-time (which, naturally, has been complicated by the allegations against Brady).

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Female students challenge myths — Julia Yoo and Emily Feldman

From Financial Times

Many women continue to struggle with the decision to attend business school, fearing the cost, the commitment and the competitive environment.

As two of the youngest women entering the MIT Sloan School of Management MBA in 2012, we had the same concerns. However, we were pleasantly surprised, so we have taken it on ourselves to challenge the four myths we believe hold women back.

You will waste money

Business school is expensive but it can be a solid investment. Despite the steep and intimidating price tag, an MBA can lead to a lifetime earning potential of more than $3 million, according to one study that reveals it takes, on average, about four years to recoup the return on investment of an MBA.

Moreover, 95 per cent of both women and men graduates from 12 US business schools report being satisfied with their MBA education, according to a joint study released by Catalyst, the University of Michigan Business School and the Center for the Education of Women at the University of Michigan.

Family will suffer

Getting an MBA does not necessarily mean putting family second. “Success for either parent is success for the entire family,” a female mentor once told us. In fact, while pursuing our MBAs, we were pleasantly surprised to meet a number of mothers and fathers with young children who were actively involved parents while participating in and contributing to their business school communities.

Read the full post at The Financial Times.
Julia Yoo and Emily Feldman are both recent MBA graduates of MIT Sloan School of Management, where they served as co-presidents of the Sloan Women in Management Club.

MIT Conference on the digital economy, London post-show — Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

MIT Sloan’s Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee speak with Dave Vellante and Stu Miniman from theCube for the live post-show to the MIT Conference on the Digital Economy: The Second Machine Age to wrap up the themes from the day, the takeaways, and the questions that still need to be answered.

MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/ide/

On April 10, 2015, the MIT Digital Economy Conference: The Second Machine Age, led by Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, and Andrew McAfee, co-director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, featured a series of discussions that highlight MIT’s role in both understanding and shaping our increasingly digital world.

Erik Brynjolfsson is the Schussel Family Professor of Management Science, a Professor of Information Technology, and the Director of the MIT Center for Digital Business at the MIT Sloan School of Management. 

Andrew McAfee is a principal research scientist at the MIT Center for Digital Business.

Starting up innovation: How your company can empower intrapreneurs — Elaine Chen

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Elaine Chen

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Elaine Chen

From TechBeacon

When you think of Michelin, you probably think of tires. In particular, the tires you’re about to replace on your car. The 126-year-old French company evokes images of reliable, durable rubber tires for all kinds of vehicles. “Pushing the envelope” or “cutting-edge innovation” probably aren’t the first phrases that come to mind. Yet pushing the envelope is precisely what the company’s Michelin Incubators is designed to help a corporate entrepreneur, or intrapreneur, do.

Led by SVP and Director Ralph Dimenna, Global Incubators was created to accelerate innovation outside Michelin’s core rubber tire business. The program works like a startup incubator, but it recruits teams from within Michelin. Corporate entrepreneurs pitch their ideas to executives to win a round of funding. Once they close on the funding, they put together a team and form a startup that works on the idea full time. The team tests its hypotheses in the market until they either find the product/market fit or pivot to something else.

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Could a Baltimore happen in Chicago? — Robert McKersie

MIT Sloan Prof. Emeritus Robert B. McKersie

MIT Sloan Prof. Emeritus Robert B. McKersie

From The Huffington Post

Recently we have witnessed the unfortunate sequence of legitimate and responsible protest actions being hijacked by those who use the crowd effect of many marchers as a cover for their criminal activities of looting and burning. This same juxtaposition occurred 50 years ago this summer in Chicago and there are some lessons to be learned — so history does not need to repeat itself.

It was clear that Chicago was in for a long hot summer when on May 22, 1965 the board of education reappointed superintendent of schools, Benjamin Willis — and in so doing, violated assurances that leaders of the civil rights movement had received that Willis would retire. Nightly marches from Buckingham fountain to city hall and the board of education soon followed — in some cases marchers were arrested for blocking traffic. During the third weekend in July, Martin Luther King arrived in Chicago and led a march of more than one thousand participants.

By far the most noteworthy marches were those led each evening by the comedian, Dick Gregory. On August 1 and 2 his group decided to march to the home neighborhood of Mayor Daley. A crowd of over one thousand neighbors gathered and the police, in order to avoid a major confrontation, ordered the 50 marchers to leave or be arrested. Gregory and most of his followers were arrested.

Soon thereafter on August 12 riots broke out on the west side when an undermanned fire truck killed a black women. At the height of the riot a police car was sent to the headquarters of the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations to bring the convener and civil rights activist, Al Raby to the troubled streets.

While any riot is lamentable, by comparison to the turmoil that occurred in the Watts section of Los Angles at the same time, matters in Chicago were quickly brought under control, largely due to the actions of the police and the leaders of the civil rights movement.

Read the full post at The Huffington Post.

Robert McKersie is Professor Emeritus of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management.