Crowdsourcing is the best weapon in fight against fake news – David Rand and Gordon Pennycook

Associate Professor of Management Science and Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT Sloan School of Management

From The Hill

The problem of misinformation isn’t new, but it gained widespread attention during the 2016 presidential election when blatantly false stories (“fake news”) spread widely on social media.

Since then, a broad consensus has emerged that we must better understand why people believe and share misinformation and figure out how to stop it.

Limiting the spread of fake news, hyperpartisan content, conspiracy theories and other kinds of misinformation is important for our democracy. It seems likely to decrease the gap between liberals and conservatives about basic facts and to diffuse some of the cross-party animosity that is so prevalent today. Less misinformation may also make it harder for individuals to win elections based on blatantly false claims.

While there has been a lot of scholarly work documenting the spread of misinformation, there has been much less study of possible solutions. And most of the solutions that social media companies have been deploying so far haven’t been very effective; they also have been almost exclusively focused on fake news rather than other kinds of problematic content.

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How Lies Spread Online – Sinan Aral

From The New York Times

The spread of misinformation on social media is an alarming phenomenon that scientists have yet to fully understand. While the data show that false claims are increasing online, most studies have analyzed only small samples or the spread of individual fake stories.

My colleagues Soroush Vosoughi, Deb Roy and I set out to change that. We recently analyzed the diffusion of all of the major true and false stories that spread on Twitter from its inception in 2006 to 2017. Our data included approximately 126,000 Twitter “cascades” (unbroken chains of retweets with a common, singular origin) involving stories spread by three million people more than four and a half million times.

Disturbingly, we found that false stories spread significantly more than did true ones. Our findings were published on Thursday in the journal Science.

We started by identifying thousands of true and false stories, using information from six independent fact-checking organizations, including Snopes, PolitiFact and Factcheck.org. These organizations exhibited considerable agreement — between 95 percent and 98 percent — on the truth or falsity of these stories. Read More »