Watch this global market for clues about inflation and interest rates — Kristin Forbes

MIT Sloan Prof. Kristin Forbes

MIT Sloan Prof. Kristin Forbes

From MarketWatch

Trying to predict currency movements is — as they say here in the U.K. — a mug’s game. Any economist, myself included, will tell you it’s virtually impossible to do.

And yet, movements in exchange rates are incredibly important. They affect a country’s competitiveness — influencing everything from export competitiveness to GDP growth. They affect the prices of items coming from abroad, from oil to oranges to iPhones. They make it harder, or easier, to repay foreign debt and they affect earnings on foreign investments.

Currency movements also have big implications for the outlook for inflation. This relationship is known as “pass-through,” because it captures how changes in the exchange rate “pass-through” to import prices and then inflation.

So even if we can’t predict exchange rate movements, we need to understand how exchange rates will affect the economy. And for those of us tasked with setting monetary policy, understanding how currency movements pass-through into inflation is critical to our decision on when to adjust interest rates.

The problem is, much of what we thought we knew about pass-through has not been holding up well.

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The Editorial.com interview — Kristin Forbes

MIT Sloan Professor Kristin Forbes

MIT Sloan Professor Kristin Forbes

From TheEditorial.com

Interview by Heidi Legg

When we set out to find a visionary and thinker in the financial sector to add to our collection of interviews, Kristin Forbes’ name was suggested to us by other economists, as well as from other women her age in finance, the arts and by those equally formally educated, who have opted to stay at home and raise kids. It was one of the first times that such a varied range of people suggested someone to us.

We began to research her. We were intrigued that the Bank of England had selected this American economist to join their Monetary Policy Committee as one of two external members. And we were curious about hearing from someone who was in the White House during President Bush’s years, a controversial President, and who watched the collapse of the financial markets that has brought forth finger pointing and reform. But what interested us most was that this MIT Professor was one of the earliest thinkers to focus on financial contagions. I sat down with Kristin to discuss contagions, the current thinking on energy, inflation and economic growth.

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Don’t rush to blame the Fed — Kristin J. Forbes

MIT Sloan Professor Kristin Forbes

MIT Sloan Professor Kristin Forbes

From the New York Times

Last week, Turkey’s central bank surprised investors by raising a key interest rate to 10 percent from 4.5 percent. It was a bold move to rein in inflation and calm the markets. But Turkey’s prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has been vocal in blaming the “interest-rate lobby” — a supposed conspiracy of foreign bankers, and some economists and journalists — for volatility in stock prices and a steep decline in the lira.

Turkey is far from the only country to blame foreigners for recent market turmoil. Venezuela’s president, Nicolás Maduro, recently complained of a “psychological war from abroad.” The governor of the Central Bank of Brazil, Alexandre Antônio Tombini, describes rising interest rates in rich countries as a “vacuum cleaner” that indiscriminately sucks capital out of emerging markets.

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Containing Contagion: ‘There is no replacement for good macro-fundamentals’ — Kristin Forbes

MIT Sloan Prof. Kristin Forbes

What began as a singular sovereign debt problem in Greece in 2009 quickly spread to the rest of Europe. First Ireland; then Portugal and Spain and Italy. Today—only three years after the first signs of trouble—virtually all Europeans have felt the destructive effects of the euro zone turmoil, and its impact is being felt around the world.

Contagion, a phenomenon where financial tumult in one country or region spreads to another country, is now a fact of life. The globalization of finance has, in many ways, made contagion inevitable. The world has become much more integrated through trade, investors, and banks, and these ties have caused countries’ financial markets to move together more closely during good times and bad. Read More »

Kristin Forbes: Economists must bridge disciplines to find answers to financial crises

MIT Sloan Prof. Kristin Forbes

In 2009 when my colleagues at the National Bureau of Economic Research and I began planning a conference for a project we’re running on the global financial crisis, we were concerned that the material would no longer be timely when the symposium actually occurred. We needn’t have worried.

I’ve just returned from Washington, DC, where our symposium was held, and again financial crises were the topic of the day. Three years after cracks in the subprime mortgage market erupted into the most severe and synchronized global financial crisis and recession since the Great Depression, the world economy is once more in dangerous territory. What began as a singular sovereign debt problem in Greece has spread to the rest of Europe, and now threatens to become a second act to the first financial crisis. How did we get here? And how can we keep it from happening again?

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