Innovating in a world of patent lawsuits — Elaine Chen

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Elaine Chen

From TechCrunch

This fall, Apple once again won the dubious honor of dominating the conversation on patent infringement.

First, it lost a ruling in Germany’s top civil court over the slide-to-unlock feature, backing an earlier ruling in favor of Motorola Mobility. As expected, Apple is appealing the ruling.

Then, it scored a victory when it won a patent ruling against Samsung in the U.S. appeals court over the same feature, plus two others (autocorrect and data detection). As expected, Samsung is appealing the ruling.

Then, it took a hit when a federal jury decided that Apple infringed on a 1998 University of Wisconsin-Madison patent covering performance-improving processing technology. As expected, Apple is appealing the ruling.

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MIT Sloan Experts Twitter Chat: #FutureofWork – Erik Brynjolfsson

MIT Sloan Prof. Erik Brynjolfsson

MIT Sloan Prof. Erik Brynjolfsson

The acceleration of technology has led to remarkable benefits for business and the economy – but what about people earning middle- and base-level incomes?

Join MIT Sloan Experts’ (@mitsloanexperts) #FutureofWork Twitter chat with Erik Brynjolfsson (@erikbryn), director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, as he discusses how digital innovations can create a more inclusive, productive and sustainable future for all. Tim O’Reilly (@timoreilly), founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media, will host the chat and ask Erik questions that will help guide the conversation.

The chat will take place on Wednesday, April 13, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. EST.

How do you get involved? It’s simple! If you have a question or a response to one of Tim O’Reilly’s questions, just include “#FutureofWork” in your tweet.

The #FutureofWork Twitter chat will promote registration for the MIT Inclusive Innovation Competition, open from March 1 – June 1, 2016, which celebrates organizations that create economic opportunity in the digital era.

Advice for Greece: Don’t let a crisis go to waste — Phil Budden

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Phil Budden

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Phil Budden

From Fortune

Whether Greece stays in the Eurozone and accepts its bitter medicine or is one day forced to exit the single currency, the country’s future is usually regarded as bleak. Either course seems to promise years of hardship and privation for the Greek people.

From another perspective, though, one could see opportunity for Greece. “Never let a crisis go to waste,” is a quote attributed to Winston Churchill, who knew something about crises. Greece today has a chance to turn adversity into advantage. With change in the air, it will be easier for the country’s institutions, government leaders, and people to abandon some of the failed approaches of the past and to embark in new directions.

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The patent system isn’t broken; we just aren’t using it intelligently – Joe Hadzima

Joe Hadzima, Senior Lecturer, Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship

From The Huffington Post

Much of the talk about the U.S. patent system generates a lot of heat, but little light. We hear complaints about how the system doesn’t work and varied suggestions for fixing it. However, it’s not really broken. It serves its original purpose of granting exclusive rights to inventors for a set period of time in exchange for disclosure of the invention’s secret sauce (i.e. – disclosure to spur innovation).

The problem is that society is not getting the benefit of this bargain. Part of that is due to the very technical descriptions found in patents today. They are dense and complex; it often takes a legal team and technical experts to make sense of them. It’s no wonder that patents aren’t sources of inspiration for innovation.

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How tech can stop the looming food crisis — Jason Jay

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Jason Jay

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Jason Jay

From Fortune

The world’s population is expected to increase from 7 billion today to 9 or 10 billion by the end of the century, according to the United Nations. We also can expect more pressure on the food supply as people in the developing world adopt middle class lifestyles, which usually involve eating more meat. To satisfy global demand, we will need to roughly double today’s output, which means getting smarter about how we produce and manage food.

The good news is that innovation is coming to the farm. Advanced information technology, improved communications systems, robotics, drones, and other new technologies have the potential to boost agricultural yields and reduce waste while tempering environmental degradation.

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