Tech innovators open the digital economy to job seekers, financially underserved – Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

From The Wall Street Journal

The future of work is a prime interest of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, started in 2013 by researchers Erik Brynjolfsson and Andy McAfee. To help come up with answers to questions about the impact of automation on jobs and the effects of digital innovation, the group launched the MIT Inclusive Innovation Challenge last year, inviting organizations around the world to compete in the realm of improving the economic opportunities of middle- and base-level workers.

 More than $1 million in prizes went to winners of the 2017 competition in Boston last month in four categories: Job creation and income growth, skills development and matching, technology access, and financial inclusion. Awards were funded with support from Google.org, The Joyce Foundation, software firm ISN, and ISN President and CEO Joseph Eastin.

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“The Future of American Innovation”– a podcast with David Schmittlein

MIT Sloan Dean David Schmittlein

MIT Sloan Dean David Schmittlein

MIT Sloan’s David Schmittlein appeared on CEO Global Foresight to discuss how the United States is leading world innovation in life sciences, information technology, and energy.

The segment was recently made available as an 8-minute podcast on the Innovation Gamechangers podcast, available on iTunes.

Dean Schmittlein also discusses innovation clusters and how the MIT community encourages a culture of collaboration and action learning. The program also includes interviews DARPA director Arati Prabhakar and Carl Dietrich, an MIT alumnus and CEO of flying car company Terrafugia.

Listen to Innovation Gamechangers podcast, available on iTunes.

David Schmittlein is the John C Head III Dean and Professor of Marketing at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

S.P. Kothari: India's Faltering Boom, and How to Revive It

MIT Sloan Deputy Dean S.P. Kothari

From Forbes.com 

As the U.S. and Europe teeter on the edge of a devastating double-dip recession, India’s economic boom—once considered a bright spot in an otherwise bleak global financial landscape—is also showing signs of weakness.

The International Monetary Fund recently cut its growth projection for India, warning that the country was perilously close to double-digit inflation. (In the past fiscal year, India’s economy grew 8.5%; before the financial crisis, its growth exceeded 9% for three straight years.) The IMF cited “a drag from renewed global uncertainty” as the main reason for the revision, but that is letting India off easy.

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Big data drives security, risk discussion at MIT CIO affair

From Enterprise CIO Forum

I’ve  sat through the first two two sessions at the MIT Sloan CIO Symposium, expecting to hear all about the wonderful opportunities doing digital business.

Was I wrong!  The sessions, entitled 1) “Opportunities in the Digital Business World” and 2) “What every CIO should Know about the Future impact of Digital Business,”  focused on security, risk, privacy and how to manage infinite oceans of data were the dominant topic. We heard words like “headaches” and “hacker.”

Certainly, no one has corned the market for a playbook that explains how CIOs deal with vast amounts of data, all that threatens it and how to exploit it.

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Riding the Rising Information Wave–Are you swamped or swimming? MIT hosts experts

MIT Sloan Prof. Erik Brynjolfsson

This week, two conferences on related topics are scheduled for successive days at MIT—the annual MIT Sloan CIO Symposium today and the annual meeting of the MIT Center for Digital Business Thursday. Attendees at both events will include executives responsible for their organizations’ information services.

These leaders have very important jobs these days. Information management is no longer an obscure, technical department in companies. The success of firms can well hinge on how information managers do their jobs.

Every 1.2 years, the volume of business data worldwide doubles. In the course of the two days that the conferences are being held—actually any two days this year—businesses around the world will produce more data than all of the world’s businesses produced in all of history before 2003.

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