Job creation to meet population growth a daunting task — S.P. Kothari

MIT Sloan Deputy Dean S.P. Kothari

From MoneyControl.com 

In an exclusive interview with CNBC-TV18’s Malvika Jain on July 02, 2014, SP Kothari, Deputy Dean, MIT Sloan School of Management gave his take on the expectations from Arun Jaitely’s maiden Union Budget and his outlook on the road ahead for the Indian economy.

Below is the verbatim transcript of the interview:

Q: Government is in the process of preparing its first Budget since it took charge. What should be the priority areas where the government should focus?

A: Mr. Jaitley has to recognize and Mr. Modi also has to recognize that changing the furniture around the house is not going to make the house look that much different. It might make it look somewhat different but that is not a game changer and they have to think in terms of policies that dramatically alter if the goal is to increase the per capita income from where it is currently at about 1500 to say about USD 5000 in 10 years. Those game changing policies will have to focus on population growth, they will have to focus on FDI, they’ll have to focus on how our governance is and how our law enforcement is. Just to name a few set of policies that Mr. Jaitley should pay attention to in the maiden budget that he would be presenting on the 10th of July.

Q: Arun Jaitley has indicated that sector specific FDI is something that the government is going to be looking at. Do you think that that is going to be sufficient to spur investment flow into the country?

A: People’s decision to spur investment only partially hinges on what sectors are open for an investment. People’s decision to invest is influenced to a large extent by what kind of climate there is; climate includes what kind of law enforcement there is, what kind of labour supply there is, what kind of tax regime there is, what kind of regulation exists in general and is it easy to do business or not – open new businesses as well as close new businesses. So, the look has to be much more holistic in attracting foreign investment rather than a piecemeal approach by saying that we will open certain sectors for investment and wait for foreign investment to flow. I don’t think that is going to change or make a dramatic improvement in the investment climate.

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Say “yes” to speak with a representative — service automation frustrating customers — Peter Weill

MIT Sloan Sr. Researcher Peter Weill

Have you tried to apply for a mortgage lately? If so, you might have some rather unpleasant memories of filling out endless forms and – if you had a question — trying to navigate through a voice recognition telephone system that didn’t understand you. If you were able to actually reach a real person, that employee might have been more focused on the procedure than actually listening to you. What is the result of this automation of processes? Not surprisingly, it’s disconnected and frustrated customers. Read More »

S.P. Kothari: India's Faltering Boom, and How to Revive It

MIT Sloan Deputy Dean S.P. Kothari

From Forbes.com 

As the U.S. and Europe teeter on the edge of a devastating double-dip recession, India’s economic boom—once considered a bright spot in an otherwise bleak global financial landscape—is also showing signs of weakness.

The International Monetary Fund recently cut its growth projection for India, warning that the country was perilously close to double-digit inflation. (In the past fiscal year, India’s economy grew 8.5%; before the financial crisis, its growth exceeded 9% for three straight years.) The IMF cited “a drag from renewed global uncertainty” as the main reason for the revision, but that is letting India off easy.

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Preparing MBAs for the global economy

MIT Sloan Deputy Dean JoAnne Yates

Our global economy calls for managers with a global business education. A solid foundation in management theory must be accompanied not only by practical applications of that knowledge, but also by a deep understanding of the cultures and economies in other regions, exposure to students, faculty and experts from around the world, and opportunities to learn first-hand about business issues in other countries.

MIT Sloan has been a pioneer in this area, recognizing the need early on to prepare MBA students for global careers. For nearly 30 years, our MBA student body has reflected this commitment with approximately 40% of students coming from outside the U.S. And as a global institution, we’ve been able to attract and retain top faculty from around the world. Students benefit not only from professors’ cutting-edge research on international business issues, but also from their diverse perspectives on business.

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