A judicial whodunnit: Shedding light on unsigned opinions — Andrew Lo

MIT Sloan Professor Andrew Lo

From WBUR Cognoscenti

Within legal circles, the mystery of “Whodunnit?” has increasingly become “Who wrote it?” as courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, keep issuing opinions without divulging who actually authored them. Since 2005, for example, the Roberts Court has disposed of at least 65 cases through unsigned per curiam opinions. Many cases also came with unsigned concurring or dissenting opinions.

We place a high value on transparency in our democracy, and that should certainly apply to Supreme Court justices, who, after all, are already protected by lifetime tenure. Obscuring authorship removes the sense of judicial accountability, making it harder for experts and the public alike to understand how important issues were resolved and the reasoning that led to these decisions, especially in controversial cases. We’ve all heard the charge that judges are legislating from the bench — but assessing that claim requires, at the least, the ability to link opinions to individual decision makers.

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MBA Craig Hosang answers questions about the 2012 Silicon Valley Tech Trek

Craig Hosang, MBA '13

From Thomson Reuters peHUB, January 12, 2012

An MBA on Becoming Relevant to an Industry “That’s Doing Fine Without You”

Connie Lozios

‘Tis the season for MBA students to begin looking for summer internships, and students at the MIT Sloan School of Management are no exception. In fact, just last week they took their annual “tech trek” to Silicon Valley to shake hands, flash smiles, and otherwise engage with executives at companies like Facebook, Intel, and eBay.

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Prof. Evan Apfelbaum: A blind pursuit of racial colorblindness — Research has implications for how companies manage multicultural teams

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Evan Apfelbaum

My research investigates the science of diversity. Some of the questions I’ve been working on lately explore what strategies people use to appear unprejudiced in social situations, and to what extent these efforts are effective.

Ever see the Colbert Report on Comedy Central? One of Stephen Colbert’s recurring jokes is that he is “racially colorblind.” Colbert, the political satirist who portrays a self-important right wing commentator, says things like: “I don’t see race … People tell me I’m white, and I believe them, because I own a lot of Jimmy Buffett albums.” His colorblindness is a running joke and repeated on the show with different punch lines some tamer than others.

It’s a very funny routine. And Stephen Colbert gets away with it because he’s a comedian. But in the real world, racial colorblindness is a tricky subject. In my research, I’ve discovered that people who claim to be colorblind and go to great pains to avoid talking about race during social interactions, are in fact perceived as more prejudiced by black observers than people who openly acknowledge race.

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