GO-Lab Puerto Rico – Stuart Krusell

Director of the MIT Sloan Office of International Programs Stuart Krusell

Director of the MIT Sloan Office of International Programs Stuart Krusell

It has been one year since Hurricane Maria wreaked havoc in Puerto Rico, with 155 mph winds devastating the power infrastructure, shutting down roads, and, damaging an already fragile economy with total losses estimated at $91B.  More tragically, nearly 3,000 people lost their lives.  Recovery continues, but it is, by no means, complete.

Six months after the storm slogged across the island, I had the opportunity to spend a week there, traveling with a group of eleven MIT Sloan EMBA students and award-winning filmmaker Bill Carter.  They were there as part of their GO-Lab class, working on two projects addressing the value and viability of integrating reliable microgrid systems to improve resiliency and reliability in the delivery of power for the Puerto Rican people and economy.  One team focused on the architecture, the other on regulation.  Both are critical to finding a sustainable solution.  Their conclusions included:

• microgrids are viable, but an unbundling of the market needs to occur

• operators must prepare to manage the inevitability of grid defection

• support is needed for providers to pilot and coordinate on microgrids

• development of a full-functioning energy system with robust deployment of microgrids requires a fully modernized grid

• an independent and empowered energy regulator is essential to ensure steady and durable energy policy and attract adequate levels of private investment

• stakeholders must break out of their silos, minimize partisan divides, and work collaboratively to reach consensus to advance their (unrecognized) shared interests in stable, long-range policies

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MBA diary: Making a difference – Sean Jennings

Sean Jennings, MIT Sloan EMBA '18

Sean Jennings, MIT Sloan EMBA ’18

From The Economist 

Sean Jennings, an Executive MBA student at the MIT Sloan School of Management, has gone back to school, decades after dropping out of college. “I don’t need to make any more money; I’m interested in making a difference.”

When people ask me why I—a college drop-out turned tech entrepreneur—decided to go back to school to get my Executive MBA, I tell them about my older brother, Michael. On New Year’s Eve in 1967, Michael and I both came down with a mysterious virus. We were babies at the time—he was two and I was one. No doctor could figure out the cause of it. Ultimately, I got better. But Michael was brain damaged.

I have always known how fortunate I am. I got to grow up and lead a healthy person’s life. Michael, who has the cognitive function of a toddler, spent his teens and twenties in an institution and now lives in a group home.

From a young age, I felt that my purpose was to take care of my brother. When I got older, I realised that would cost a lot of money. My goal was to attend the best college I could and then pursue the highest-paying career I could tolerate. Getting accepted to MIT on an Air Force scholarship was one of the proudest moments of my life. But two years into college, I got injured. The military released me on honourable medical discharge. I couldn’t afford tuition and didn’t want to take on overwhelming debt, so I dropped out. Read More »

Jonathan Lehrich: Global Organizations Lab brings the MIT EMBA to Leading Companies

Jonathan Lehrich, Director, MIT Sloan Executive MBA Program

Working full-time while earning their MBA, students in MIT Sloan’s Executive MBA Program are constantly applying what they learn in class to their jobs. There is a compounding effect in that the more times they apply what they learn, the more they accumulate knowledge and expertise in their toolkits.

However, it’s a big world out there and a lot more can be learned when they have an opportunity to apply that knowledge outside of their own companies. After all, there are only so many experiments you can do in your own company before you bump into barriers. Read More »

MIT and the US Navy team up on alternative energy

From WGBH Greater Boston, September 29, 2011

The world’s largest Navy is going green. The United States Navy and the MIT Sloan School of Management have teamed up in an effort to help wean the Navy off petroleum. Emily Rooney interviews US Navy Energy Security Analyst and MIT EMBA Lt. Damian Blazy and Jonathan Lehrich, MIT EMBA Program Director.

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MIT’s Jonathan Lehrich talks executive MBA with Pimm Fox on Bloomberg TV

I recently appeared on Stock with Pimm Fox on Bloomberg TV (May 18, 2011)  to discuss MIT’s new executive MBA program. I was pleased to have the opportunity to share with Bloomberg’s viewers what makes the MIT EMBA program unique and how the members of our inaugural class are already applying what they’ve learned to their jobs in corporate America.

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