American children need to stop being taught to fear the topic of race – Evan Apfelbaum

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Evan Apfelbaum

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Evan Apfelbaum

From Quartz

The killing of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African American teenager from Florida—and the jury’s subsequent acquittal of George Zimmerman, the white man who shot him. The fatal shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed African American teenager from Ferguson, Missouri, by white policeman Darren Wilson—and the decision by a grand jury not to indict the officer. The massacre of nine African Americans by a white supremacist at a Charleston church in June 2015. These are just a sampling of violent racially charged incidents that have taken place over past three years.

These episodes have sparked rage, disillusionment, sorrow, resentment, and confusion. According to a New York Times/CBS News pollconducted last month, nearly six in 10 Americans, including majorities of both white and black people, think race relations in the US are generally bad, and nearly four in 10 say the situation is worsening.

Yet in spite of this awareness and introspection, our country is still incapable of a coherent, intelligent national conversation about race. Indeed, the subject of race is so sensitive and so volatile that most people are apt to avoid it altogether. Why is that?

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Anjali Sastry's forthcoming book: "Parenting Your Child with Autism"

MIT Sloan Sr. Lecturer Anjali Sastry

My new book,* Parenting Your Child with Autism, is, in many ways, the book I wish I’d received all those years ago when my oldest son was first diagnosed. In the ten years since then, I’ve come to realize that my MIT training in science and management can help parents of children with autism. My co-author, Dr. Blaise Aguirre, and I packed this book with information and advice that we think will help parents choose the right treatments, educational approaches, and developmental goals for their child.

Let’s not sugarcoat this: parenting a child with autism will never be easy. Even with our book in hand, parents will still struggle with making tough choices amid incomplete information, limited funds and time to try new and different things, and not enough sleep.

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