What does the future of work look like? – Lee Ullmann

See the livestream video from

MIT’s Future of Work conference, held Aug. 29,  2019, in São Paulo, Brazil

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What does the future of work look like? How are emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence (AI) and automation, creating opportunities for new types of jobs and demand for new types of skills? Where should industry leaders invest to foster competition, increase productivity, and create a more inclusive workplace? And what can policymakers do to ensure that the next generation of employees have the education and training to succeed?

These are pressing questions for our global economy and they are especially urgent here in Brazil. In the aftermath of a severe economic crisis and recession, Latin America’s largest and most industrialized economy is facing a slow and uneven recovery. More than 10% of the country’s workforce is unemployed, and a quarter of the unemployed population is between the ages of 18-24. Meanwhile, about 13 million Brazilians work less than they could or would like to.

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Join the #MITSloanBrazil Twitter Chat on the “Future of Work: The Effects of AI, Automation, and the Changing Economy” on August 21

The digital age is impacting all aspects of life, including the future of work. Technological innovations have the potential to transform the workplace and enhance productivity, but it will take proactive and thoughtful discussion to harness these innovations for social benefit.

To explore this further, MIT Sloan Experts is hosting the #MITSloanBrazil Twitter chat on August 21 at 9 a.m. ET (10 a.m. São Paulo) to discuss the topics and themes of the upcoming Future of Work Conference in Brazil.

The conference, which will bring together leading experts from business and academia, aims to highlight the ways in which artificial intelligence, automation and the changing economy are affecting the future of work. This issue is crucial in Brazil, where 12 percent of the country’s workforce is unemployed.

The Twitter chat on August 21 will be hosted by Gabriel Azevedo (@gabrielazevedo), Professor of Constitutional Law, Head of Institutional Relations & Public Policy at Jusbrasil and Councilman in Belo Horizonte. He will be asking questions about the Future of Work and the upcoming conference to Lee Ullmann (@MITSloanLatAm), Director of the MIT Sloan Latin America Office, Jason Jackson (@JasonBJackson), Assistant Professor of Political Economy and Urban Planning at MIT, and Fernando Shayer (@CaminoEducation), CEO of Camino Education.

Join us on Twitter on August 21 at 9 a.m. ET (10 a.m. São Paulo) and follow along using the hashtag #MITSloanBrazil. Your comments and questions are encouraged! Simply include #MITSloanBrazil in your Tweets.

The economic future of China-Latin America relations — Stuart Krusell

Director of MIT Sloan's Office of International Programs Stuart Krusell

Director of MIT Sloan’s Office of International Programs Stuart Krusell

What do the economies of Latin America and China have in common? They are both extremely interdependent on the other for growth.

China purchases a significant percentage of raw materials from Latin America, which are used in the manufacturing of goods. Many of those goods are then sold back to Latin America. This cycle has increased over the last decade, as China’s trade with the region has surged more than 20-fold since 2000. So while they are competitors, they also are trade partners. It’s a slice of globalization that is representative of the larger world.

China and Latin America’s relationship becomes even more intriguing when you consider the geo-political environments of both regions. What is the impact of Brazil’s elections on its trade partnership? Populist rhetoric to keep jobs local and not to be so dependent on China is appealing to many, but what happens to the region’s economy if trade with China decreases? Further, how do the corruption investigations in China impact trade? If China’s GDP is affected, it could mean the country is buying fewer natural resources from Latin America.

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Innovating Beyond GDP — Otto Scharmer

MIT Sloan Sr. Lecturer Otto Scharmer

Ask almost any economist or government official about how they measure a nation’s progress and they are likely to answer with three letters: GDP, or gross domestic product. But just as there is growing disenchantment with the way we currently run our economies, there is also now mounting discontent with GDP as the main and sometimes only indicator of social and economic progress.  That’s why I am partnering with others to launch the Global Wellbeing & Gross National Happiness (GNH) Lab to explore new ways of measuring and implementing well-being and progress in societies around the world. Read More »

5 things you need to know about venture capital in Brazil

Image Credit: VentureBeat.com

From VentureBeat.com

Brazil has been generating a significant amount of buzz in the venture capital and startup community recently, fueled in part by media coverage of several high profile firms “planting their flags” in the country with dedicated funds or investments. A growing awareness of the burgeoning Brazilian startup scene, and Brazil’s role as host in the upcoming World Cup and Olympics, has further elevated the country’s profile. Read More »