B2B sellers need to get on the machine-learning bandwagon – Matias Adam

Matias Adam, Lecturer at MIT Sloan School of Management

From The Hill

As companies collect increasing amounts of data about customers, a key challenge is connecting that information to customize the customer experience and boost sales. The customer journey begins long before the actual sale.

It starts with online searches, store visits, conversations and emails. Companies need to connect all of these touch points to identify potential customers and turn research and exploration into sales.

While business-to-consumer (B2C) markets have been deploying customer data platforms to consolidate the customer experience and improve marketing personalization, this has been a bigger challenge in the business-to-business (B2B) markets.

This is due to the complexity of B2B, where each customer has multiple decision-makers and users that are not always identified in the early stages, and the entire sales cycle is longer and relies on fewer leads, prospects, opportunities and sales than in B2C space.

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The problem with big data – Maryam Farboodi

Maryam Farboodi, Assistant Professor of Finance, MIT Sloan Management

From MIT Sloan Management Review

As technology improves, larger companies continue to gain disproportionate shares of the processing power and financial value big data offers.

Because of big data — a term that has come to refer to the immense amount of digital material we generate, store, and manipulate with increasing ability — managers can measure more about their companies and then use that information to drive performance. Need to heighten the productivity of your workforce? Big data can help. Want to analyze customers’ preferences and purchase patterns? Big data can do that, too. Looking for ways to cut costs and increase profitability? Big data: At your service.

But not all companies are flourishing in this new era. Small companies are struggling. Over the last three decades, the annual rate of new startups has fallen from 13% to less than 8%. During that time, the percentage of employment at companies with fewer than 100 workers has decreased by 5%. Meanwhile, big companies are thriving. The share of revenue of the top 5% of businesses has increased by 10% since the 1980s. Large companies also employ a greater share of the U.S. labor force: from one-quarter in the 1980s to about one-third today. What accounts for this discrepancy?

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Is this the new class every student should take? – Dimitris Bertsimas

MIT Sloan Prof. Dimitris Bertsimas

From eSchool News

With the high-school graduation season over, it’s time for grads and parents alike to celebrate and relax a bit – and maybe enjoy a long summer before recently minted graduates start college or a new job.

But here is something to contemplate (hopefully not too strenuously) over the coming summer weeks and months: What is the next learning step in the graduate’s preparation for a future career?

Whether a recent graduate plans to study 18th Century English literature in college or jump right into the workforce in any number of jobs, I have a one-word suggestion for them: Data.

Specifically, start learning about the analysis of data.

As seemingly odd as that might sound – perhaps even odder than the elder gentleman who recommends “plastics” to the young Dustin Hoffman character in the classic movie “The Graduate” – the simple fact is that our lives and careers, moving forward, will be increasingly influenced and determined by data analytics in just about every field, from what consumer products we buy to the type of medical treatments our doctors prescribe.

The data analytics era is already here. We see it every time we surf the web and those same pesky advertisements keep following us around, from site to site, no matter how much we try to lose them. Those ads are the result of data-analytic computations by Google and others designed to specifically figure out, mathematically, our consumer interests based on past purchases and web browsing histories.

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Reimagining Chile’s healthcare system: Harnessing the power of strategic analytics and Big Data to keep patients healthier for less money – Rafael Epstein, Marcelo Larraguibel, Lee Ullman

Lee Ullmann, Director of the MIT Sloan Latin America Office

Lee Ullmann, Director of the MIT Sloan Latin America Office

From El Mercurio

Economic growth, urbanization, and rising affluence are having a profound impact on the health of Latin Americans. Very little of it is positive, especially in Chile.

While life expectancy has increased faster in Chile than in most OECD countries and income per person has quadrupled over the last quarter-century, great disparities continue to exist between the country’s public and private healthcare systems. Healthcare costs are skyrocketing and many of the country’s public hospitals—especially those in rural areas—face a shortage of general practitioners and family physicians.

The modern Chilean diet—comprised largely of ultra-processed foods and sugary drinks—is taking a toll. One third of Chilean children are overweight or obese; one quarter of Chilean adults are in those categories. Chronic diseases, like diabetes, are increasingly prevalent. Stress-related disorders and mental illnesses are also on the rise, as are rates of alcoholism, tobacco use, and certain types of cancer. Over the last decade suicide has been one of the top 10 causes of death in Chilean men.

Today’s statistics are bleak, but we have hope for the tomorrow. Technological innovations and discoveries, powered by Big Data, hold enormous opportunities for Chile and Latin America overall. To explore this further, we are hosting a conference next month in Santiago—“Strategic Analytics: Changing the Future of Healthcare”—that aims to highlight the many ways in which data and analytics promise to transform the provision of healthcare. The conference is expected to draw hundreds of researchers and leaders from academia, health care, government, and industry.

Our agenda is ambitious. By combining MIT’s expertise in analyzing massive amounts of data and optimizing complex systems with Universidad de Chile’s path-breaking medical research and Virtus Partners’ strategic and operational insights, we aim to unravel the complicated underlying problems that plague the healthcare system.

Of course many countries—including the US—face healthcare challenges. Our hope is that this conference inspires engineers, medical professionals, economists, and technologists from all over the world to see the benefits of working together to improve human health. Our goal is simple: to keep patients healthier for less money.

Progress is afoot. At MIT, researchers have devised algorithms that boost treatment for certain diseases, including diabetes, using a combination of machine learning and electronic medical records. At a time when 1.7 million Chileans, or about 12.3% of the population, have diabetes, this research has important implications.

The dawn of telemedicine—which enables doctors to monitor patients from afar—also holds promise, particularly for patients who live in remote areas. (Chile is a long and skinny country, and about 10% of the population lives in rural areas.) Researchers at the Universidad de Chile’s Medical Informatics and Telemedicine Center are using sensors and other devices to monitor patients’ blood pressure, heart rate, weight, and blood sugar levels from great distances. Technologists at the MIT Media Lab are finding new ways to apply emotion technology and wearable devices to help sufferers with autism, anxiety, and epilepsy manage their symptoms.

Researchers are also finding new ways to contain medical costs. Using Big Data to measure returns of healthcare spending, economists are able to help hospitals uncover best practices and align incentives to improve the quality of the care they provide. This has special relevance to Chile. The country’s Fondo Nacional de Salud (FONASA) struggles with overwhelming management challenges and increasing costs. Meanwhile, access to high-quality technology and healthcare services is still limited to the wealthy.

The promise of Big Data is immense, but so, too, are its perils. Many questions remain: How do we ensure that patient data stays both confidential and secure? How do we safeguard against Big Data applications creating even more disparities between the rich and poor, and instead use it to build a more equitable healthcare system for all? And how should governments cope with managing the high costs of aging populations?

These are big challenges and nothing will be solved overnight. Our hope is that the conference will point to new ideas and solutions that improve patient health for generations to come.

Read the original blog post at El Mercurio.

Lee Ullmann is the Director of the MIT Sloan Latin America Office.

Rafael Epstein is the Provost of Universidad de Chile.

Marcelo Larraguibel is the Founder of Virtus Partners, the management consultancy, and an Advisory Council Member of the MIT Sloan Latin America Office (MSLAO).

Mark Cuban and Nate Silver talk technology, analytics, sports and more

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban and FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver spoke last weekend at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, covering a wide range of topics. Watch a video excerpt from their conversation:

Read the full interview at FiveThirtyEight or more about the MIT Sloan’s 11th Annual Sports Analytics conference.