Is your organization ready to become an ecosystem driver? – Peter Weill

MIT Sloan Senior Researcher Peter Weill

MIT Sloan Senior Researcher Peter Weill

From Xconomy

Dominating business-to-consumer sales, Amazon seems ready to take over the world of business-to-business too. In its first year, Amazon Business generated $1 billion in sales. However, there is still room for competition. It’s not yet an ecosystem driver in B2B, although the longer it takes for other business supply companies to catch up, the harder it will be to beat Amazon.

This is a good example of the importance of learning how to thrive in a digital ecosystem. Companies must learn to become ecosystem drivers – even if only for a subset of their customers – in order to survive. These drivers have become the destination for their spaces like Amazon with consumer products, Aetna with healthcare needs, and USAA for life events. So what does it take to be a successful ecosystem driver?

The first step is to assess your current business model. Are you an omnichannel business with an integrated value chain? Are you a supplier that sells through another company? Or are you a modular producer that adapts to other companies’ ecosystems? Most businesses today generate revenue with one or more of these models.

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Understanding the implications of consumer empowerment in health care — Renée Richardson Gosline

MIT Sloan Prof. Renée Richardson Gosline

From Huffington Post

The days of the passive patient and omnipotent Marcus Welby-like physician are long gone. Since the 1990s, consumer empowerment in health care has been increasing, most notably with the advent of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription medicines. Then, the rise of digital media allowed consumers to search symptoms and create communities around common disease experiences. More recently, the ability to shop for health insurance through health care exchanges and obtain treatment at drug store clinics has led to a new age of consumer empowerment.

We’ve gone from a B-to-B model to a B-to-C model in health care. This shift in power to consumers has many implications when it comes to how we make decisions about our health care. Here are six ways that a behavioral lens can help us understand the implications of empowering consumers in health care:

1. Heuristics

Heuristics are very important. These mental shortcuts or “rules of thumb” allow us to make decisions efficiently. However, these judgments are subject to non-rational (or biased) influences in the marketplace. For example, a retail promotion like a drug store coupon can affect the price on which patients “anchor” their judgments about the appropriate cost of health care. And a retail clinic can affect the appeal of non-healthy alternatives with their location, like in the candy aisle. While this may not have been a big deal before, it is an important consideration in a B2C retail environment.

Read the full post at The Huffington Post.

Renée Richardson Gosline is an Assistant Professor of Marketing in the Management Science group at MIT’s Sloan School of Management. She teaches the MBA course in Branding.

Relevance, Resources, Relationships: How to Create a B2B Content Marketing Strategy — Sharmila C. Chatterjee

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Sharmila C. Chatterjee

From Huffington Post

In 1895, John Deere, the agricultural machinery company, debuted a slight publication called The Furrow targeted at farmers and ranchers. Back then, The Furrow was a simple newsletter containing pen-and ink-drawings, articles about farming techniques, ads for new plows, and a section tailored for women readers that featured products like cream separators. Fast-forward 118 years to today: The Furrow is still published – albeit in glossy form, complete with its own website, Facebook page, and Twitter feed. It has circulation of 1.5 million.

The Furrow is one of the earliest examples of content marketing, an approach that involves creating, distributing, and exchanging information to attract, engage, and retain a clearly defined audience, with the ultimate goal of driving sales. According to a recent survey by the Content Marketing Institute (CMI), 91% of North American B2B marketers use content marketing as part of their current marketing strategy.

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