What does the future of work look like? – Lee Ullmann

See the livestream video from

MIT’s Future of Work conference, held Aug. 29,  2019, in São Paulo, Brazil

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What does the future of work look like? How are emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence (AI) and automation, creating opportunities for new types of jobs and demand for new types of skills? Where should industry leaders invest to foster competition, increase productivity, and create a more inclusive workplace? And what can policymakers do to ensure that the next generation of employees have the education and training to succeed?

These are pressing questions for our global economy and they are especially urgent here in Brazil. In the aftermath of a severe economic crisis and recession, Latin America’s largest and most industrialized economy is facing a slow and uneven recovery. More than 10% of the country’s workforce is unemployed, and a quarter of the unemployed population is between the ages of 18-24. Meanwhile, about 13 million Brazilians work less than they could or would like to.

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Join the #MITSloanBrazil Twitter Chat on the “Future of Work: The Effects of AI, Automation, and the Changing Economy” on August 21

The digital age is impacting all aspects of life, including the future of work. Technological innovations have the potential to transform the workplace and enhance productivity, but it will take proactive and thoughtful discussion to harness these innovations for social benefit.

To explore this further, MIT Sloan Experts is hosting the #MITSloanBrazil Twitter chat on August 21 at 9 a.m. ET (10 a.m. São Paulo) to discuss the topics and themes of the upcoming Future of Work Conference in Brazil.

The conference, which will bring together leading experts from business and academia, aims to highlight the ways in which artificial intelligence, automation and the changing economy are affecting the future of work. This issue is crucial in Brazil, where 12 percent of the country’s workforce is unemployed.

The Twitter chat on August 21 will be hosted by Gabriel Azevedo (@gabrielazevedo), Professor of Constitutional Law, Head of Institutional Relations & Public Policy at Jusbrasil and Councilman in Belo Horizonte. He will be asking questions about the Future of Work and the upcoming conference to Lee Ullmann (@MITSloanLatAm), Director of the MIT Sloan Latin America Office, Jason Jackson (@JasonBJackson), Assistant Professor of Political Economy and Urban Planning at MIT, and Fernando Shayer (@CaminoEducation), CEO of Camino Education.

Join us on Twitter on August 21 at 9 a.m. ET (10 a.m. São Paulo) and follow along using the hashtag #MITSloanBrazil. Your comments and questions are encouraged! Simply include #MITSloanBrazil in your Tweets.

In the age of expanding automation, companies must redefine work – Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

From The Wall Street Journal 

Over the past few years, a number of papersreports and books have addressed the future of work, and, more specifically, the impact of artificial intelligence, robotics and other advanced technologies on processes that once fell within the human domain. For the most part, they view AI as mostly augmenting rather than replacing human capabilities, automating the more routine parts of a job and increasing the productivity and quality of workers. Overall, few jobs will be entirely automated, but automation will likely transform the vast majority of occupations.

Case closed, right? Not quite. Given these predictions about the changing nature of work, what should companies do? How should firms prepare for a brave new world where we can expect major economic dislocations along with the creation of new jobs, new business models and whole new industries, and where many people will be working alongside smart machines in whole new ways?

“Underneath the understandable anxiety about the future of work lies a significant missed opportunity,” wrote John Hagel, John Seely Brown and Maggie Wooll in a new report from the Deloitte Center for the Edge, Redefine Work: The untapped opportunity for expanding value. “That opportunity is to return to the most basic question of all: What is work? If we come up with a creative answer to that, we have the potential to create significant new value for the enterprise. And paradoxically, these gains will likely come less from all the new technology than from the human workforce you already have today.”

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Tech innovators open the digital economy to job seekers, financially underserved – Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

MIT Sloan Visiting Lecturer Irving Wladawsky-Berger

From The Wall Street Journal

The future of work is a prime interest of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, started in 2013 by researchers Erik Brynjolfsson and Andy McAfee. To help come up with answers to questions about the impact of automation on jobs and the effects of digital innovation, the group launched the MIT Inclusive Innovation Challenge last year, inviting organizations around the world to compete in the realm of improving the economic opportunities of middle- and base-level workers.

 More than $1 million in prizes went to winners of the 2017 competition in Boston last month in four categories: Job creation and income growth, skills development and matching, technology access, and financial inclusion. Awards were funded with support from Google.org, The Joyce Foundation, software firm ISN, and ISN President and CEO Joseph Eastin.

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The outsourced mind – Renée Richardson Gosline

MIT Sloan Prof. Renée Richardson Gosline

From TEDx Talks

We can’t remember any numbers without our cell phones and have difficulty driving without Waze. We increasingly rely on technology to perform basic cognitive tasks, and this choice is becoming more automatic and less conscious. We assume technology improves our choices. But does it?

A series of experiments will be used to examine the topic, leaving the viewer with the question: when do I assume greater rationality from technology, and how does that affect my expectations about my own behavior?

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx.

Renée Richardson Gosline is a Senior Lecturer and Research Scientist at the MIT Sloan School of Management.