Artificial intelligence, predictive analytics: How MBA campus recruiting is changing – Jean Ann Schulte

MIT Sloan Director of Employer Relations & Recruiting Services Jean Ann Schulte

From Business Because

Traditionally, recruiting is an on-campus, very structured, time-intensive, and expensive process. Students and employers learn about each other through a series of organized activities like mixers, presentations, coffee chats, treks, interview prep sessions, invite-only dinners, and interviews.

While the largest, most prominent companies continue to host a full schedule of events at their preferred schools, new approaches are emerging.

Employers seek to cut the cost and time required to hire, while increasing the predictability of a new hire’s success. Students have less time and more employment options. Given the rising demand for talent, they expect a more personalized approach and put greater emphasis on cultural fit.

Enter Artificial Intelligence (AI) and predictive analytics. Together, they automate much of the process of sourcing and engaging qualified, interested candidates. It’s a hot field—the number of VC-backed startups focused on the hiring process and employment has increased six-fold in 10 years, with more than 100 companies entering the space in each of the past three years.

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Artificial Intelligence Will Soon Shop For You, But Is That A Good Thing? – Renée Richardson Gosline

MIT Sloan Prof. Renée Richardson Gosline

From WBUR’s Cognoscenti

We’ve all had bad department store shopping experiences. The aggressively cheerful salesperson. The unforgiving glare of the dressing room. The overstuffed racks of garments where none of the sizes fit, and the ones that do, don’t come in your favorite color.

The advent of online shopping has helped consumers gain more control over their shopping experiences. But digital purchases are often a gamble, too. You scroll through endless webpages to find the perfect boots only to discover your size is on back order for two months. And the items you purchase frequently disappoint: The jacket that looked so elegant on the website’s model looks awkward on your frame.

Retail prognosticators claim that artificial intelligence and other new technologies will offer shoppers salvation. In the not-so-distant future, armies of robots using retina recognition software (à la “Minority Report”) will tailor their sales pitches to your preferences and price point. Voice-activated assistants and digital mannequins will help you to find just the right fit. Shopping from home will be a breeze too: Virtual reality headsets will allow you to “try on” clothes and sample items ranging from a tube of lipstick to a tennis racket. Two-day shipping? How antiquated. In the future, your package will arrive via drones in less than two hours. It may sound like science fiction but, in fact, many stores are testing these innovations and have plans to roll them out to customers.

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The jobs that AI can’t replace — Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

MIT Sloan’s Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

From BBC

Current advances in robots and other digital technologies are stirring up anxiety among workers and in the media. There is a great deal of fear, for example, that robots will not only destroy existing jobs, but also be better at most or all of the tasks required in the future.

Our research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has shown that that’s at best a half-truth. While it is true that robots are getting very good at a whole bunch of jobs and tasks, there are still many categories in which humans perform better.

And, perhaps more importantly, robots and other forms of automation can aid in the creation of new and better jobs for humans. As a result, while we do expect that some jobs will disappear, other jobs will be created and some existing jobs will become more valuable.

For example, machines are currently dominating the jobs in routine information processing. “Computer,” after all, used to be an actual job title of a person who sat and added long rows of numbers. Now it is, well, an actual computer.

On the other hand, jobs such as data scientist didn’t used to exist, but because computers have made enormous data sets analyzable, we now have new jobs for people to interpret these huge pools of information. In the tumult of our economy, even as old tasks get automated away, along with demand for their corresponding skills, the economy continues to create new jobs and industries.

Read the full post at the BBC.

The authors also appeared on the BBC’s “Panorama” for a segment titled “Could A Robot Do My Job.”  See the program here.

Erik Brynjolfsson is the Schussel Family Professor of Management Science, a Professor of Information Technology, and the Director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy at the MIT Sloan School of Management. 

Andrew McAfee is the Principal Research Scientist at the MIT Center for Digital Business.