Unlocking the value of data – Allison O’Hair

MIT Sloan Lecturer Allison O'Hair

MIT Sloan Lecturer Allison O’Hair

Compared to five years ago, the amount of data we now generate is huge. Some companies collect that data, but more often than not they don’t do anything with it. Business analytics is an important tool to help organizations harness the power of that data. By unlocking its value, you can do things like improve profits, predict consumer behavior, better understand markets, and make more informed decisions. Most importantly, it can give you a competitive edge.

For those of us in the field of operations research, data analytics is a huge and exciting area. It’s a critical tool for businesses moving forward. As a result, we’re offering MIT Sloan’s popular Analytics Edge course on the MITx online, interactive learning platform this spring. We want to share the cutting-edge knowledge generated at MIT on this important topic with people around the world. Read More »

Using analytics to manage diabetes – Allison O’Hair

MIT Sloan Lecturer Allison O'Hair

MIT Sloan Lecturer Allison O’Hair

What do data, analytics, and optimization have to do with diabetes? I believe they have a great deal to do with each other. These operations research tools may be the key to solving this major health crisis.

First, let’s examine the problem:

- About 25.8 million people in the U.S. – or 8.3% of the population – have diabetes today.

- By 2050, it’s projected that one in three U.S. adults could have it.

- In 2010, 285 million people worldwide had diabetes, with that number projected to increase to 438 million by 2030.

- If not controlled, diabetes can cause serious complications, such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and amputation.

- Diabetes cost the U.S. $245 billion in 2012 alone Read More »

Modeling Twitter — Tauhid Zaman

MIT Sloan Assistant Professor Tauhid Zaman

We often hear that the Internet is unpredictable, that it’s the “Wild West.” That would seem to be especially true of a social medium such as Twitter. After all, tweets are by definition instant and short-lived. But in a paper I and my co-authors just submitted to the Annals of Applied Statistics, we describe a model we have developed that predicts how popular a tweet is likely to be within just a few minutes of when the “root tweet” is posted.

And anyone who wants to can now try out our model by visiting www.twouija.com.

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Why digital maturity matters–”Digerati” drive true value from investments — George Westerman

MIT Sloan Research Scientist George Westerman

For all of the talk about how social media, mobile and analytics are transforming our lives, the majority of big companies still have a long way to go in their digital transformation. However, two years of study with more than 400 firms around the world shows that a quarter of firms are already achieving a measurable “digital advantage” over their peers.

This research, conducted by the MIT Sloan Center for Digital Business in cooperation with research sponsor Capgemini Consulting, shows that the digital advantage is not about luck or about the industry your firm is in. It is not just about how much cool digital stuff firms are doing. Companies that manage their digital activities in a certain way are 26% more profitable than their industry peers, and outperform on other measures as well. Read More »

MIT Sloan Alumna Judy Lewent on the future of finance

MIT Sloan Alumna Judy Lewent

Recently MIT Sloan alumna Judy Lewent was inducted into the Financial Executives International Hall of Fame. A former executive vice president and chief financial officer of Merck, Lewent was recognized for her performance, leadership and integrity as a financial professional who has made significant contributions to the betterment of her organization and profession. The following is an excerpt of her remarks at the event:

“It is a momentous time for finance. As the global economy teeters on the brink, much of the world stands by holding its collective breath. This is, no doubt, a time of great anxiety. That anxiety is shared, not just by 50% of the public or 75% or even 99%. Everyone shares it.

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