Twitter Chat: #MITHealthUChile – Lee Ullmann, Juan Velásquez y Andrea Obaid

¿Cuál es el futuro de las analíticas aplicadas a la atención médica en Latinoamérica?

Únanse para una conversación entre Lee Ullmann (@MITSloanLatAm), director de la Oficina para América Latina de MIT Sloan, Juan Velásquez (@juandvelasquez), profesor de la Universidad de Chile, y Andrea Obaid (@AndreaObaid), periodista, autora y nuestra presentadora. Platicaremos sobre el futuro de la atención médica en Latinoamérica.

La plática por Twitter tendrá lugar el 15 de mayo desde las 13:30 hasta las 14:30 CLT (1:30 – 2:30 PM ET).

¿Cómo pueden participar? ¡Es sencillo! Si tienen una pregunta, respuesta o comentario, simplemente incluyan #MITHealthUChile en sus Tweets.

La conversación en Twitter es un precursor de la conferencia “Strategy Analytics: Changing the Future of Healthcare” (“Estadísticas Estratégicas: Cambiando el Futuro de la Atención Médica”), organizada por la escuela de negocios MIT Sloan con participación de la Universidad de Chile. Tendrá lugar el 25 de mayo en Santiago, Chile. La conferencia reunirá a investigadores y líderes del rubro de la salud y de instituciones gubernamentales, y más de una docena de presentadores discutirán formas de desplegar información y estadísticas para impulsar la innovación en la industria.

En promoción de las ideas de la conferencia, tendremos una conversación en Twitter sobre el futuro de la atención médica de Latinoamérica, así como otras ideas de interés a tratarse en la agenda.

Do you think fake news can be killed with the truth? Think again–Sharon Pian Chan, Andre Alfred

Andre Alfred, Executive MBA Student at MIT Sloan

Andre Alfred, Executive MBA Student at MIT Sloan

Sharon Pian Chan, Executive MBA Student at MIT Sloan

Sharon Pian Chan, Executive MBA Student at MIT Sloan

From Art + marketing

The presidential election exposed deep divisions in the country, among our families, friends, in the workplace and in the classroom.

Buzzfeed’s recent findings about the power of fake news is particularly troubling. The 20-most read fake stories got more traffic than the top 20 stories reported by credible news organizations that verify facts and validate stories.

In fact, people writing fake news are making more money than journalists committed to reporting the truth, according to Seattle Times columnist Danny Westneat, who talked to a fake news site in Seattle called Bipartisan Report.

Fake news sent a man with an assault rifle to a pizza shop in Washington, D.C., searching for a fictional child sex ring connected to Hillary Clinton. (Check out The Washington Post’s story.)

What are the forces behind the creation and, let’s face it, widespread consumption of lies?

Read More »

The secret to repairing a broken conversation – Daena Giardella

Daena Giardella, MIT Sloan Sr. Lecturer

Daena Giardella, MIT Sloan Sr. Lecturer

From Quartz

We’ve all been there. In the midst of a productive conversation with a colleague, something unexpected happens. It might be an awkward phrase or an unintended tone of voice, or maybe someone simply says something we don’t want to hear. Suddenly the conversation has veered off course and one or both of us now feels disregarded, disrespected, or just plain angry.

It’s common in these situations for one or both people to shut down and begin to avoid the conversation or, perhaps, each other entirely. It’s as if the conversational road disappears and we’re suddenly in off-road conditions that are full of nerve-wracking pitfalls and uncomfortable dust-ups as we make clumsy attempts to salvage the dialogue. We blame the other person, we lick our wounds, and we retreat inward. The problem is that these reactions are ineffective and destabilizing in business settings where team and one-on-one conversations are crucial for planning and productivity.

Read More »

Is your organization ready to become an ecosystem driver? – Peter Weill

MIT Sloan Senior Researcher Peter Weill

MIT Sloan Senior Researcher Peter Weill

From Xconomy

Dominating business-to-consumer sales, Amazon seems ready to take over the world of business-to-business too. In its first year, Amazon Business generated $1 billion in sales. However, there is still room for competition. It’s not yet an ecosystem driver in B2B, although the longer it takes for other business supply companies to catch up, the harder it will be to beat Amazon.

This is a good example of the importance of learning how to thrive in a digital ecosystem. Companies must learn to become ecosystem drivers – even if only for a subset of their customers – in order to survive. These drivers have become the destination for their spaces like Amazon with consumer products, Aetna with healthcare needs, and USAA for life events. So what does it take to be a successful ecosystem driver?

The first step is to assess your current business model. Are you an omnichannel business with an integrated value chain? Are you a supplier that sells through another company? Or are you a modular producer that adapts to other companies’ ecosystems? Most businesses today generate revenue with one or more of these models.

Read More »

Corporate boards need to abolish mandatory retirement — Bob Pozen

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Robert Pozen

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Robert Pozen

From Real Clear Markets

The resignation under duress of the CEO of Wells Fargo, after being pummeled in a Congressional hearing, raises a fundamental question: how can corporate boards hold management accountable for performance problems? One trendy answer from several governance mavens — limit the terms of independent directors so they do not become unduly deferential to the CEO.

The most typical limit on independent directors is mandatory retirement at age 72. This is the tenure limit for the Wells Fargo board. It is a significant limit because most directors do not join large company boards until age 60.

Read More »