Maine can be a leader in solar energy, but rooftop by rooftop isn’t how it will happen – Richard Schmalensee

MIT Sloan Professor Richard Schmalensee

MIT Sloan Professor Richard Schmalensee

From The Bangor Daily News

Renewable forms of energy, especially solar, have shown strong growth in recent years in the U.S., and that is certainly a positive development. As policymakers across the country continue to encourage this growth, it is important that they take a close look at the policies in place that provide favorable incentives to the solar industry. Currently, Maine has an opportunity to be among a select group of leaders on this front, as the state’s regulators work toward refining policies around solar energy.

Specifically, the proposal put forth by the Maine Public Utility Commission to reform net energy billing and ultimately transition to a more market-based approach for pricing solar energy production is a great example of how we should be thinking about these policies. Here’s what our key consideration should be: What is the most effective and efficient way to grow renewable energy production?

One of the main answers here is that while distributed solar energy can benefit homeowners and communities, it is not nearly the most technically or economically efficient way to achieve the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Ultimately, large scale solar is much more effective, and it will do more to help keep Maine’s electricity rates among the lowest in the region.

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Artificial intelligence, predictive analytics: How MBA campus recruiting is changing – Jean Ann Schulte

MIT Sloan Director of Employer Relations & Recruiting Services Jean Ann Schulte

From Business Because

Traditionally, recruiting is an on-campus, very structured, time-intensive, and expensive process. Students and employers learn about each other through a series of organized activities like mixers, presentations, coffee chats, treks, interview prep sessions, invite-only dinners, and interviews.

While the largest, most prominent companies continue to host a full schedule of events at their preferred schools, new approaches are emerging.

Employers seek to cut the cost and time required to hire, while increasing the predictability of a new hire’s success. Students have less time and more employment options. Given the rising demand for talent, they expect a more personalized approach and put greater emphasis on cultural fit.

Enter Artificial Intelligence (AI) and predictive analytics. Together, they automate much of the process of sourcing and engaging qualified, interested candidates. It’s a hot field—the number of VC-backed startups focused on the hiring process and employment has increased six-fold in 10 years, with more than 100 companies entering the space in each of the past three years.

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Artificial Intelligence Will Soon Shop For You, But Is That A Good Thing? – Renée Richardson Gosline

MIT Sloan Prof. Renée Richardson Gosline

From WBUR’s Cognoscenti

We’ve all had bad department store shopping experiences. The aggressively cheerful salesperson. The unforgiving glare of the dressing room. The overstuffed racks of garments where none of the sizes fit, and the ones that do, don’t come in your favorite color.

The advent of online shopping has helped consumers gain more control over their shopping experiences. But digital purchases are often a gamble, too. You scroll through endless webpages to find the perfect boots only to discover your size is on back order for two months. And the items you purchase frequently disappoint: The jacket that looked so elegant on the website’s model looks awkward on your frame.

Retail prognosticators claim that artificial intelligence and other new technologies will offer shoppers salvation. In the not-so-distant future, armies of robots using retina recognition software (à la “Minority Report”) will tailor their sales pitches to your preferences and price point. Voice-activated assistants and digital mannequins will help you to find just the right fit. Shopping from home will be a breeze too: Virtual reality headsets will allow you to “try on” clothes and sample items ranging from a tube of lipstick to a tennis racket. Two-day shipping? How antiquated. In the future, your package will arrive via drones in less than two hours. It may sound like science fiction but, in fact, many stores are testing these innovations and have plans to roll them out to customers.

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Technology vs. location: Why U.S. shale oil & gas forecasts could be over-estimated – Francis O’Sullivan

MIT Sloan Sr. Lecturer Francis O’Sullivan

From The Energy Collective

Over the last five years, Americans have enjoyed consistently low oil and gas prices thanks to a massive uptick in the production of oil and gas produced from shale in the U.S. This industry growth has enabled the country to play an increasingly important role in global and domestic energy markets. But how long will these low prices and high productivity levels last? The answer is of great importance for matters like the economy and national security – not to mention the price you pay for gas.

If you look at our current production levels, you might think the good times will last for quite a while. The U.S. is now considered by some to be the world’s “swing producer” of shale oil and gas. In North Dakota’s Williston tight oil basin, crude oil production grew from 98,000 barrels a day in 2005 to 1,174,000 barrels a day in 2015. As a result, the U.S. power sector has drastically increased its reliance on domestically produced natural gas, especially from shale.

A lot of credit for this industry growth is going to technology. Many people say that the technology used to get the resources out of the rock – and the subsequent technology developments – are to thank for the gains we’ve seen in well productivity. But how much can we really link to technology versus the location of the wells?

Looking at this question in a recent study, we found that the oil and gas business is just like real estate. It’s all about location, location, location. Where you drill matters, but in the shale business it matters even more.

We looked at data from the Williston Basin during a 42-month period starting in 2012 to quantify the extent to which improvements in well productivity have been associated with technology as opposed to changes in development location. Using five different regression models, we found that the impact on technology on well productivity is greatly over-estimated. In fact, our study showed that the portion of improvement that came from technology is over-estimated by about 50%. This means that a great deal of the time, the operator was just drilling in the right spots.

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How to incubate innovation–Christian Catalini

MIT Sloan Professor Christian Catalini

MIT Sloan Professor Christian Catalini

From MIT SMR Custom Studio

The first thing an organization can do to nurture innovation is to tap into its own human capital. At a high level, all organizations care about ideas, and more often than not, in corporate settings, people already have ideas. Staff have expertise, know the customers, and throughout the organization they can interface with interesting sources of data and information.  It’s just that their day-to-day requirements do not allow them to execute. Slack time can be an important lever for incubating creativity and a meaningful way for executing ideas employees have had in mind for some time.

But if you ask employees to be entrepreneurial, it’s not same – they may end up directing their own unit, but not building and scaling a multi-billion dollar start-up. It’s hard when you have the safety and surroundings of a large organization to act like entrepreneurs who have to attract capital from outside. The challenge is once you identify talent and the ideas inside to incentivize to execute an experiment as though it were a start-up. Perhaps the biggest organizational change is to think like a small start-up.

From an organizational perspective, firms can learn a great deal from university accelerators. At MIT, we have Global Founders’ Skill Accelerator, where we get students with good ideas to scale businesses. The interesting thing is that students who have no experience of entrepreneurship get feedback and advice from a set of seasoned entrepreneurs. Similarly, an enterprise may have skills and expertise on the tech side, but no track record of taking an idea and scaling it to a multi-billion project. The challenge is how to recruit entrepreneurs to train employees with the good ideas to take them to the next level.

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