Watch Live: Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson discuss their new book, “Machine, Platform, Crowd: Harnessing our Digital Future” June 26

Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

MIT Sloan’s Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We hope you’ll tune in to the next installment of the MIT Sloan Expert Series.

Join us on June 26, 2-2:30 pm ET for a live conversation with Andrew McAfee ​and ​Erik Brynjolfsson, co-authors of the new book Machine, Platform, Crowd: Harnessing our Digital Future, which is being hailed as “a must-read road map” for success in the digital economy. The book is a sequel to their bestseller The Second Machine Age.

Beth Comstock, Vice Chair of GE, appears​ on the program to discuss how the company harnesses the wisdom of the crowd for product ​innovations and design.

Sandy Pentland, MIT Professor of Media Arts and Science, also joins us to talk about managerial best practices for navigating this new world of rapidly advancing technology.

You will be able to view the live show by bookmarking this site and tuning in June 26 at 2 pm ET.

Submit your questions on Twitter using #MITSloanExperts before and during the show. Your question could be answered live on the air.

Blockchain: New MIT Research Looks Beyond the Hype – Christian Catalini

MIT Sloan Professor Christian Catalini

MIT Sloan Professor Christian Catalini

From Crowdfund Insider

With a market capitalization of approximately $12 billion and with the price of Bitcoin reaching towards its 2016 high, Bitcoin is both the most established and the most secure cryptocurrency. Its ascendancy has triggered both a great deal of enthusiasm and a fair share of concern.

On the utopian side, optimistic proponents assert that cryptocurrencies will free consumers from the tyranny of their domestic currencies, will force out entrenched financial players and payment systems, will reduce transaction costs for businesses and fees for consumers.

On the dystopian side, pessimistic opponents argue that cryptocurrencies may undermine traditional monetary policy, support illicit activity, or simply cannot meet the speed, scale and privacy requirements of real-world financial applications and marketplaces.

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Join the #MITSloanExperts “Breaking Through Gridlock” Twitter chat, June 5

Breaking Through Gridlock, by Jason J. Jay

Breaking Through Gridlock, by Jason J. Jay

Professor Jason J. Jay, author of Breaking Through Gridlock, will discuss the power of conversation in overcoming polarization via effective and positive conversation during the #MITSloanExperts Twitter chat on Monday, June 5th at 12 p.m. EDT. Jason will join his co-author, Gabriel Grant, to discuss how we can fuel healthy dialogues and innovation to enrich relationships and create powerful pathways forward. You can search the #MITSloanExperts and #BreakingGridlock hashtags to join the conversation in real time.

Professor Jason J. Jay is a Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and the director of the Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan. He holds a bachelor’s in psychology and a master’s in education from Harvard and a doctorate in management from MIT.

Gabriel Grant is the CEO of Human Partners and cofounder of the Byron Fellowship Education Foundation. He holds a master’s in leadership and sustainability from Yale and a master’s in ecological systems engineering and a bachelor’s in physics from Purdue.

Just the facts: Information access can shrink political divide – Evan Apfelbaum & Erik Duhaime

MIT Sloan Asst. Prof. Evan Apfelbaum

MIT Sloan Ph.D. student Erik Duhaime

From The Hill

Political polarization in the U.S. is at its highest level in decades. This isn’t surprising, especially in the wake of the recent presidential election.

It’s hard to go on social media, much less cable news these days and not see reports that support one political side and vilify the other. Is there any hope for bringing the country closer together? We think so.

In a recent study, we found that the way information is presented can influence political polarization. When it is presented in a way that engages people in an objective analysis of the information at hand, political polarization can decrease. Yet when the same information provokes people to think about their relevant political preferences, people remain polarized.

In other words, people might moderate their views when they have more information on how a contentious policy works, but not if they’re busy thinking about what they want or why they want it.

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To get ahead, corporate America must account for climate change–John Reilly

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer, John Reilly

From The Hill

Scott Pruitt’s confirmation last week as chief of the Environmental Protection Agency was a setback for environmentalists and scientists who waged a fierce campaign against the nominee.

As Oklahoma’s attorney general, Pruitt led or took part in 14 lawsuits that sought to block EPA regulations and policies intended to tackle climate change. In addition, his views on global warming put him at odds with both the stated positions of many companies and their current policies toward climate change.

Pruitt is one of many announced appointees who is hostile to efforts aimed at reducing emissions linked to global warming. Many in the administration are skeptical that climate change is caused by human activity or doubt its consequences will be significant. President Trump has expressed extreme skepticism about climate change, calling it a hoax created by China.

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