Here’s proof that Wall Street regulators listen to you — Andrei Kirilenko

MIT Sloan Professor Andrei Kirilenko

MIT Sloan Professor Andrei Kirilenko

From MarketWatch

Especially concerning business regulations, critics argue, an inside the Beltway mentality prevails. Only the lobbyists and industry insiders are heard.

I am sensitive to this criticism. Five and half years ago, the United States experienced the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. In response to the crisis, Congress passed the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. One part of the legislation instructed a financial regulatory agency called the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) to write rules that regulate “swaps” — the same derivatives that had been implicated in the financial crisis. As the Chief Economist of the CFTC during 2010-2012, I helped with the rulemaking process.

After leaving the federal government in December 2012 to join MIT Sloan School of Management as a finance professor, I set out to study the work that I and other staff members had done on designing new Wall Street regulations.

My goal was to create a scientific tool to evaluate whether thousands of public comments that were delivered in response to the rules proposed by the CFTC were meaningfully taken into account. I wanted to study how responsive the government is to its constituents. Is the government really for the people?

Wondering how to start, I remembered that public comments seem focused on just a few key words. Those words seemed to capture pretty much the essence of each rule, even ones that run for hundreds of pages. Building on that insight, my colleagues Shawn Mankad of the University of Maryland, George Michailidis of the University of Michiganand I set out to build a computer model. After experimenting with a few designs, we developed an automated “machine-learning” method that we call the “RegRank” algorithm.

Read the full post at MarketWatch. 

Andrei Kirilenko is the Professor of the Practice of Finance at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

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