The surest way to create millions of new jobs – featuring Bill Aulet

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Bill Aulet

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Bill Aulet

From Yahoo Finance

Tax breaks? Infrastructure spending? Free college? These are some of the ideas the presidential candidates have for boosting growth and creating jobs. But the best way to do it may be one neither candidate has highlighted: bringing more immigrants to the United States. In a Q & A with Rick Newman, Bill Aulet discusses this issue and many others.

See the video at Yahoo Finance.

Bill Aulet is the managing director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship at MIT and also a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Media bias and terrorism coverage – Neal Hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Neal Hartman

From The Huffington Post

What’s in a word? More precisely, what’s in three words: “radical Islamic terrorist.”

These words seem to be imbued with a strange power. By not uttering them, according to various Republicans, President Obama is losing the war on terrorism. Obama, on his part, has declined to use the three words together, insisting that the United States can’t be perceived as at war with the religion of Islam.

And there’s little the media loves more than a war of words – even if this squabble over semantics has, in fact, very little to do with parsing out the reasons for the horrific attack on an Orlando gay club, which left 49 people dead. The shooter, Omar Mateen, did pledge himself to ISIS, but other aspects of his life point to a troubled mind and history of violence.

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The future of management: A new era of strategic human-machine partnerships–Paul Michelman

Paul Michelman, editor-in-chief of MIT Sloan Management Review

Paul Michelman, editor-in-chief of MIT Sloan Management Review

Within the next five years, how will technology change the practice of management in a way we have not yet witnessed?

MIT Sloan Management Review posed this question to 15 of the world’s foremost experts on the intersection of technology and management who responded in a series of essays available in MIT SMR’s new Fall issue, published online today. The essays were commissioned to celebrate the launch of the magazine’s new Frontiers initiative. Appearing as part of both the print and digital editions, Frontiers explores how technology is reshaping the practice of management.

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Using optimization to improve bundle recommendations and pricing – Georgia Perakis

MIT Sloan Prof. Georgia Perakis

MIT Sloan Professor Georgia Perakis

From The Huffington Post

When you shop online, it is common for retailers to offer additional items in a bundle to try to increase sales. For instance, if you are buying towels, the seller may offer matching washcloths. Or if you are buying an airline ticket, you may be asked if you also want to purchase inflight Wifi and premium seating. If this “bundle” is appealing to you in terms of the items offered and the price, you might be motivated to buy it all. If not, the items or services are left on the table, eventually getting marked down even more.

With the online market projected to grow 57% from 2013 to 2018, retailers have the potential to significantly increase their profits through bundling. This strategy can be beneficial for customers too if they are presented with desirable items they otherwise may have missed — and at better prices. The key is creating an attractive enough bundle to incentivize the buyer to click “add to cart.”

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Fed’s focus on ‘too big to fail’ won’t save taxpayers from next bank bailout – Oz Shy

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Oz Shy

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Oz Shy

From The Conversation

Last month, the Federal Reserve announced that 31 out of 33 U.S. banks had passed its latest “stress test,” designed to ensure that the largest financial institutions have enough capital to withstand a severe economic shock.

Passing the test amounts to being given a clean bill of health by the Fed. So are taxpayers – who were on the hook for the initial US$700 billion TARP bill to bail out the banks in 2008 – now safe?

Yes, but only until the next crisis.

Skeptics of these tests (myself included) argue that passing them will not prevent any bank (large or small) from failing, in part because they’re not stressful enough and the proposed capital requirements are not high enough.

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