Believe the IoT hype or perish: Equipping today’s graduates for tomorrow’s tech — Peter Hirst

MIT Sloan Executive Director of Executive Education Peter Hirst

MIT Sloan Executive Director of Executive Education Peter Hirst

From Wired

I recently attended the second annual Internet of Things World Forum in Chicago, IL. In the opening keynote presentation, Wim Elfrink, Cisco’s EVP of Industry Solutions and Chief Globalization Officer, referenced Gartner’s latest version of its“Hype Cycle,” noted that IoT (the Internet of Things) has climbed over the past year to its peak. Yet, on closer inspection, the enviable place IoT is enjoying within this technology-evolution framework is actually named the “peak of inflated expectations,” a precarious high point where individual dazzling success stories of early adopters and visionary speculation are outshining wider market reticence and slow early adoption. In the model, this magical time is usually followed by a “trough of disillusionment,” then — if the market responds favorably to second and third-generation tech — the “slope of enlightenment,” and finally — if wide market adoption takes place — a “plateau of productivity.”

The conference certainly provided many vivid illustrations of success and the potential of IoT, but will this fledgling industry make it through the inevitable coming trough, and climb “high and right” on the chart with predicted tens of billions of connected devices, as was enthusiastically espoused by Elfrink in his opening remarks?

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How Corporate America can create better jobs — Thomas Kochan

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Kochan

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Kochan

From Fortune

In the 1987 movie Wall Street, Gordon Gekko’s memorable pronouncement that “greed is good” epitomized the worst features of American corporations that focus only on maximizing immediate shareholder returns without regard to the impact on their employees, customers, or communities.

That corporate caricature has continued to prevail. But recently, people ranging from Harvard University Business School Professor Michael Porter to leaders of the Sloan, Ford, Aspen, Hitachi (more here) and other foundations are putting forward the case that companies can provide great returns to shareholders and great jobs for employees.

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The new mathematics of startup valuation — Bill Aulet

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Bill Aulet

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Bill Aulet

From The Wall Street Journal

Valuing a company is always a mix of science and art, especially for startups.  Historically the science has been pretty simple: Find comparable companies and do a multiple of earnings or revenue.

However, three drivers of startup valuation have emerged that are changing the game. “Acquihire,” is the act of buying out a company for the skills and expertise of its staff. It has become so well-known that it is even listed in the Oxford English Dictionary. When Facebook buys a company like Hot Potato, it’s not for the revenue stream or products — it’s for the employees.

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What MIT can teach colleges about becoming an economic powerhouse — Thomas Allen and Rory O’Shea

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Allen

MIT Sloan Professor Thomas Allen

MIT Sloan Visiting Asst. Professor Rory O'Shea

MIT Sloan Visiting Asst. Professor Rory O’Shea

From Bloomberg Businessweek

In 2011, two business school professors put numbers to an idea that many assumed true: that a vibrant research university can drive an economy. They studied companies started by alumni of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and found that those businesses had provided 1.7 million jobs and generated $1 trillion in revenue annually.

As more countries try to compete in the global economy, the pressure is on policy makers and university leaders to imitate the way MIT spurs innovation and economic growth. Unfortunately, many universities struggle to match the speed and success of MIT’s model.

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Increasing click-through rates with ad morphing — Glen Urban and John Hauser

MIT Sloan Professor Glen Urban

MIT Sloan Professor Glen Urban

MIT Sloan Professor John Hauser

MIT Sloan Professor John Hauser

From Fortune China

Everyone is trying to make their banner ads and new media more effective. In the banner area, 90% of the effort is spent on targeting. If you click on a link, you’ll get a particular ad. A whole industry has emerged focused on collecting click stream data and making recommendations.

But that is only half the picture. Equally important is the question of how you should talk to consumers once they are targeted. This is what ad morphing is all about.

For example, a car company may target a consumer whose click history indicates he is interested in buying a car. However, instead of just randomly sending him car ads, it can track the consumer’s online behavior to determine his preferred communication style. We also call this his cognitive or thinking style. Does the consumer want a picture of the car at a NASCAR race? Or would the consumer prefer to look at the technical aspects of the engine? Or does the consumer want a fashion shot of a driver pulling up to a country club? What will the consumer best respond to?

This is a multi-arm bandit problem because it’s like a slot machine with many arms. The advertiser needs to choose the ideal lever to pull to match the ad to the consumer’s thinking style. However, it’s more difficult with ads because there is uncertainty as to the consumer’s thinking style.

Our algorithm addresses this issue by monitoring click stream data to determine how a consumer makes decisions on the web. After enough information is gathered, the algorithm determines the consumer’s likely thinking styles and matches the optimal ad to our estimates of thinking styles – all in real time.

Partnering with companies like General Motors to test our algorithm, we found that morphing has tremendous potential to increase banner ads’ productivity. Companies work hard just to get a 1-2% improvement in click-throughs, but we found that morphing ads based on thinking styles can improve that rate up to 83%. We also found that morphing can lead to 30% better brand recognition. These are very significant effects.

While our algorithms (see our paper for the algorithms) can be implemented by any good programmer skilled in the art, morphing can challenge the budget. To use this tool, companies have to design more ads – ads that appeal to each of the various thinking styles of customers. There also may be cross-organizational issues, as the people who create those ads must coordinate with the analysts doing the targeting.

However, this is the only algorithm that we’re aware of that integrates thinking styles and morphing in real time. It’s very cutting edge, but it can help move the market to the next wave of action in banner advertising.

Also see the post in Chinese at Fortune China.

Glen Urban is the David Austin Professor in Management, Emeritus, Professor of Marketing, Emeritus, Dean Emeritus, and Chair of the MIT Center for Digital Business at the MIT Sloan School of Management. 

John Hauser is the Kirin Professor of Marketing and a Professor of Marketing at the MIT Sloan School of Management.