Let 2016 be the year we agree tipping is terrible for both workers and customers — Oz Shy

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Oz Shy

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Oz Shy

From Quartz

What’s an acceptable percentage to tip? The amount has been accelerating without any clear economic force driving it, and with unclear benefits for all parties involved. In the 19th century and during the first half of the 20th century, a 10% tip was common. By the 1980s, 15% tips had become the standard. Now we observe 18%, 20%, and even 25% tipping rates.

Perhaps as a result, tipping is a constant source of tension and debate, and a favorite topic for social and economic critique. And, like any controversial subject, it has its own little-understood rules and oddities.


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As systems collapse, citizens rise — Otto Scharmer

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Otto Scharmer

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Otto Scharmer

From The Huffington Post

As we see pictures of German citizens cheering tens of thousands refugees arriving from Syria and other war zones, we may be witnessing an emerging pattern of the years to come: bureaucracy is failing (EU), systems collapsing (millions of Asylum seeking refugees in urgent need of helping hands) — AND: citizens rising to the occasion!

In the context of ever increasing national egoism and political hypocrisy on the side of many EU (and non-EU) politicians, the outpouring of solidarity from citizens of Munich, Frankfurt, Berlin and elsewhere is a profound sign of hope. If the EU is going to break down in the years to come, it will not be because of the millions of refugees now beginning to streaming in. It will result instead from a cold-hearted response to a humanitarian crisis that makes all the EU declarations look like a stream of empty phrases and hypocritical statements. At the moment, we see this is exemplified by the cynical policies of Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban, designed to increase refugees’ suffering and thereby deter additional refugees from seeking Asylum in EU countries or by the governments of Poland and the Baltic States that declared that they would only accept refugees of Christian faith (putting Europe back almost 400 years to the time prior to the Peace of Westphalia).

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MIT Sloan Experts Twitter Chat: #FutureofWork – Erik Brynjolfsson

MIT Sloan Prof. Erik Brynjolfsson

MIT Sloan Prof. Erik Brynjolfsson

The acceleration of technology has led to remarkable benefits for business and the economy – but what about people earning middle- and base-level incomes?

Join MIT Sloan Experts’ (@mitsloanexperts) #FutureofWork Twitter chat with Erik Brynjolfsson (@erikbryn), director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, as he discusses how digital innovations can create a more inclusive, productive and sustainable future for all. Tim O’Reilly (@timoreilly), founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media, will host the chat and ask Erik questions that will help guide the conversation.

The chat will take place on Wednesday, April 13, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. EST.

How do you get involved? It’s simple! If you have a question or a response to one of Tim O’Reilly’s questions, just include “#FutureofWork” in your tweet.

The #FutureofWork Twitter chat will promote registration for the MIT Inclusive Innovation Competition, open from March 1 – June 1, 2016, which celebrates organizations that create economic opportunity in the digital era.

MIT Sloan Expert Series — Live with Zeynep Ton, May 18, Noon, ET

Join us May 18 at 12 Eastern for a live interview with Professor Zeynep Ton, author of The Good Jobs Strategy. Ton will discuss how changes in workplace design—which include paying employees higher wages and giving them a sense of purpose and empowerment at work—translates into higher profits for companies and superior results for investors. The New York Times calls it a “radical and yet sensible idea.”

Please mark your calendar and bookmark this page.


Live streaming video by Ustream

How a big company can run fast, like a startup — Elaine Chen

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Elaine Chen

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Elaine Chen

From Xconomy

What does the word “startup” mean to you?

Many words can come to mind: new, exciting, experimental, small, lean, agile, fast. To me, “startup” mostly makes me think of “agile” and “fast.”

In an early stage startup, everybody is focused on the same thing. People are passionate, enthusiastic, hungry for an opportunity to change the world, and they will do whatever it takes to get things done. At a headcount of 5-10 people, coordination comes naturally. There are no legacy processes to slow things down. Without existing customers, the team is free to modify their products and services as they learn more. There is also a shared sense of urgency. So they run fast: because it’s fun, because they can, and because they have to.

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