MIT’s EMBA Program takes volunteering to the next level — Nelson Repenning and Diana Brennan

 

MIT Sloan Professor Nelson Repenning

MIT Sloan Professor Nelson Repenning

MIT Sloan Alumna Diana Brennan

MIT Sloan Alumna Diana Brennan

With more nonprofits incorporating each year, competition for funding is fiercer than ever. Organizations that have traditionally relied on grants and philanthropy are struggling as they look for new revenue streams to become more sustainable and impactful. While these organizations provide critical services, they often lack management resources and expertise to reach their full potential in terms of the number of people they serve. After all, how many nonprofits can afford to hire leaders with MBAs?

However, a new form of volunteerism is starting to address this need: the donation of management expertise, skills, and ideas. This is a big change from even five years ago when being civically engaged primarily meant writing a check or spending a day cleaning up a park with coworkers. This change may be due in part to the convergence of the profit and nonprofit sectors creating the emerging field of social enterprise. This shift has exposed the many ways the nonprofit sector could use operational support. As a result, “help” is becoming more broadly defined.

This new type of volunteerism — the donation of intellectual capital — can have a profound effect on organizations. By taking volunteership to the next level and matching the skills and expertise of volunteers with organizations’ needs, nonprofits can make operational and strategic improvements or possibly even pivot to change the way they serve the community. While this isn’t the most common form of volunteerism, it has the potential to add tremendous and long-lasting value.

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How branding 101 can make leaders more mindful of diversity — Renée Richardson Gosline

MIT Sloan Prof. Renée Richardson Gosline

From The Conversation

A few years ago, I overheard two of my MBA students talking after class about their “personal brands.”

At the time, I was amused. But then I kept hearing more about this notion of “my brand.” I noticed it was the subject of articles in Forbes and Harvard Business Review. Suddenly, I saw book upon book devoted to the topic. The conversation centered around bolstering your personal brand by tweeting the right things, highlighting certain attributes in your LinkedIn profile and ingratiating yourself with other powerful personal brands.

Frankly, I bristle at the phrase “personal brand.” We are not products, we are people. The way we present ourselves should be authentic, not part of a sales pitch or advertising campaign. But then I got to thinking: is there a way to apply branding’s best practices to develop greater leadership?

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MIT conference on the digital economy, London pre-show — Marshall Van Alstyne

MIT Sloan Visiting Scholar Marshall Van Alstyne

MIT Sloan Visiting Scholar Marshall Van Alstyne

Marshall Van Alstyne, visiting scholar at MIT, speaks with Dave Vellante and Stu Miniman from theCube for the live pre-show to the MIT Conference on the Digital Economy: The Second Machine Age to discuss how today’s network effect can fundamentally change a company’s business model and strategy.

MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/ide/

On April 10, 2015, the MIT Digital Economy Conference: The Second Machine Age, led by Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, and Andrew McAfee, co-director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, featured a series of discussions that highlight MIT’s role in both understanding and shaping our increasingly digital world.

Marshall Van Alstyne is a visiting scholar at the MIT Center for Digital Business.

Calories in, calories out – obesity and the energy imbalance gap — Hazhir Rahmandad

From The Conversation

The prevailing notion about obesity is that if we just work out harder and eat a little bit better, then perhaps the obesity trend will subside in a few years. However, the key to really making a difference is food – the number of calories we eat is the most important factor in obesity. But changing the way people eat will take a very long time.

Things like individual routines, menus, food access and affordability, and cultural practices all influence how we live and eat. All of these things can influence the energy imbalance gap (EIG). The EIG is essentially how many calories you consume versus how many calories you burn in a day. It controls the speed of change in body mass and is at the core of understanding obesity.

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Impressions of Seattle from an MBA trekker — Brittany Greenfield

Brittany Greenfield, MIT Sloan MBA '16

Brittany Greenfield, MIT Sloan MBA ’16

From GeekWire

When considering where to go on an MBA Technology Trek, Seattle was a no-brainer.

It wasn’t just that the city is home to some of the world’s leading technology companies, but Seattle has successfully created a technology innovation ecosystem — one that spawned many of the past few year’s largest tech IPOs. It is the philosophy of not resting on one’s laurels that has created longevity in Seattle’s companies, and provided important lessons for MBA students. My goal on a recent MIT Sloan Technology Trek was to understand the strategies, cultures, and goals that have propelled Seattle companies’ long-term success.

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