To deny the deniers, champion the cause of science — Christopher Knittel

MIT Sloan Prof. Christopher Knittel

From WBUR Cognoscenti

When a group of students recently met with me about getting MIT to divest from fossil fuels, I suggested a more effective approach: If they really want to mitigate climate change, I suggested, start by calling out politicians and others who continue to deny the scientific consensus about climate change and its causes. And as I thought about the need to hold people accountable for the consequences of their science denial, I realized that institutions such as my own — not just our students — also need to get off the sidelines. We need to do a better job of defending and championing scientific truth.

And we cannot wait. The title for a Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works that opened on July 18 gets it right:“Climate Change: It’s Happening Now.” But so, too, is denial, and not just of the manmade causes of climate change.

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Meet the woman helping to save us from a global chocolate drought — Shayna Harris

Image Credit: Mars.com

The Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan fosters a community of innovators for sustainability among students and alumni. Take Shayna Harris, who is the cocoa sustainability manager for Mars Global Chocolate, for instance. Her job—which involves travelling to cocoa farms throughout Indonesia and Africa—helps farmers to increase their yields, which both boosts the global supply of cocoa and lifts people out of poverty. Shayna recently blogged about her job at Bloomberg Businessweek.– Jason Jay, Director, Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan

From Bloomberg Businessweek

A public service announcement to chocolate lovers: The world is facing a severe cocoa shortage by the year 2020. A deficit of this magnitude threatens the future of desserts and tasty snacks everywhere. Imagine a life without M&Ms, Snickers, and Dove Bars. Bleak, right?

All kidding and product placement aside (full disclosure: I’ve worked for Mars Global Chocolate since graduating from MIT Sloan School of Management three years ago), this is serious business. The chocolate industry continues to grow, but today’s cocoa farmers don’t have access to the training and tools they need to boost productivity and meet future demand.

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A new model for transforming business into sustainable enterprise — Maurizio Zollo

MIT Sloan Visiting Prof. Maurizio Zollo

A few years ago, thought leaders and experts around the world began to meet to discuss the slow pace at which business seems to progress in tackling the challenges of innovation and change towards ideal models of sustainable enterprise. The result of those discussions was the launch of a unique initiative called GOLDEN for Sustainability (“Global Organizational Learning and Development Network”). Never before has such a multi-disciplinary, large-scale research project been undertaken in the management domain.

Since GOLDEN’s launch, experts from all business fields including, innovation, organization, strategy, marketing, accounting, human resources, business ethics and operations have been working with environmental scientists and social scientists (economists, sociologists, political scientists, psychologists etc.) to engage corporations in field experiments and clinical research. The goal is to understand how to improve and speed up the pace of business transformation to sustainable enterprises.

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Making good = profitable — Managing Sustainable Businesses–Thomas Kochan

MIT Sloan Prof. Thomas Kochan

From off-shoring good jobs to the great and growing income divide, finance-driven decision-making has long been at the core of many of our economic problems. It’s not that financial analysts and operatives are necessarily evil or uncaring – rather, they believe they have a fiduciary responsibility to generate maximum returns for their funds, even when the results have worker and society-unfriendly consequences.

Changing this mindset has proven a tough nut to crack even for union pension fund managers, who are aware of the social consequences of investment decisions. But there are glimmers of hope and interest. On June 7, for example, some of the nation’s largest institutional investors and the biggest single pension fund investor – the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CALpers) — will hold a conference to explore ways to transform socially and environmentally sustainable investment criteria from a perceived liability to an asset. CALpers has a commitment to responsible investing – for example, it calls for neutrality in union organizing – but it has never figured out how to make such policies systemic. Read More »

How (and why) women are leading sustainability efforts — Darcy Winslow

MIT Sloan Sr. Lecturer Darcy Winslow

When it comes to sustainability, women are leading what was once an underground movement. They are enacting change from anywhere and everywhere within organizations whether it’s from the top down, bottom up or middle out.

Sustainability is no longer relegated to the “green team” or people with specific job titles. At women’s networking meetings, one of the most common introductions is: “This isn’t my formal role at the company, but it is my responsibility to influence.”

This is a powerful trend, as women have been playing a significant role in sustainability efforts within organizations for decades. In the early days of the Society for Organizational Learning’s Sustainability Consortium, an inordinate number of women were representing their company, signaling the opportunity to create a space of our own to provide mentorship and support. Read More »