Why Bill Belichick cast down his tablet – John Carrier

MIT Sloan Sr. Lecturer John Carrier

MIT Sloan Sr. Lecturer John Carrier

From The Conversation

As the New England Patriots’ 10th appearance in a Super Bowl approaches, sports fans are eager to see the legendary pairing of quarterback Tom Brady and head coach Bill Belichick take on the Atlanta Falcons. Whatever the Patriots accomplish, though, won’t be thanks to all that fancy new technology assisting the Falcons and other NFL teams.

Since early October, Belichick has been limiting his use of his NFL-issued Microsoft Surface tablet and its related technological systems. On Oct. 2, Belichick was caught on national television tossing his tablet in frustration. The move came after his defense failed to prevent a Buffalo Bills touchdown pass. But what really sparked his ire was something much more common.

Who among us hasn’t, at some point, been so frustrated with a computer or other piece of technology that we contemplated throwing it out a window? The real driver in these situations, though, is far more complex than we might expect: A cascade of system failures comes to a head in a crucial moment.

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Why smart companies are embracing shadow IT — Jeanne Ross

Jeanne Ross, Director & Principal Research Scientist at the MIT Sloan School's CISR

Jeanne Ross, Director & Principal Research Scientist at the MIT Sloan School’s CISR

From Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Companies have no end of opportunities when it comes to spending their technology dollars. And over the years, individual business units have become adept at making their cases for the IT projects they want funded.

But according to our research at MIT Sloan School, top-performing companies are bypassing nice-to-have projects in favor of absolutely must-do ones by focusing on their most strategic opportunities for business transformation.

Practically speaking, this means narrowing down the programs that get funded to just a handful—and rejecting proposals for any IT projects that don’t advance one or more of those programs.

We call this “demand shaping.” Demand shaping is the process of negotiating and learning that goes on within a company as it identifies its most valuable and achievable business-change opportunities, and decides which IT programs will best support those opportunities. (Read my HPE Business Insights article “Don’t satisfy demand for IT services—shape it instead” for more on this process.)

But what about the projects that don’t get funded? Isn’t there a risk that they will just be driven underground, contributing to the ever-growing shadow IT challenge companies face today? Shadow IT, of course, is what happens when technology is brought into an organization without IT’s permission or knowledge. Some estimates put shadow IT expenditures as high as 30% of official IT budgets.

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Google Plus losing to Facebook: what it says about Internet privacy — Catherine Tucker

MIT Sloan Professor Catherine Tucker

MIT Sloan Professor Catherine Tucker

From Fortune

When Google joined the social networking space in 2011 with Google+, more than 25 million people joined in the first month. Now the number of true users on Google+ is less than 1% of the total 2.2 billion users on Google, according to a report by Stone Temple Consulting.

What happened?

Some of the decline may be explained by the fact that a Google+ profile was created automatically when people registered for Google. That alone would generate an impressive number of profiles, but wouldn’t necessarily lead to active use of the social media platform. According toForbes, just 6.7 million users have 50 or more posts ever, and only 3.5 million have 50 or more posts in the last 30 days.

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Robots add real value when working with humans, not replacing them — Matt Beane

MIT Sloan Ph.D. Student Matt Beane

MIT Sloan Ph.D. Student Matt Beane

From TechCrunch

In the popular media, we talk a lot about robots stealing jobs. But when we stop speculating and actually look at the real world of work, the impact of advanced robotics is far more nuanced and complicated. Issues of jobs and income inequality fade away, for example — there aren’t remotely enough robots to affect more than a handful of us in the practical sense.

Yet robots usually spell massive changes in the way that skilled work gets done: The work required to fly an F-16 in a combat zone is radically different from the work required to fly a Reaper, a semi-autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle, in that same zone.

Because they change the work so radically, robot-linked upheavals like this create a challenge: How do you train the next generation of professionals who will be working with robots

My research into the increasing use of robotics in surgery offers a partial answer. But it has also uncovered trends that — if they continue — could have a major impact on surgical training and, as a result, the quality of future surgeries.

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