International students flock to US university to unlock potential – and ‘invent the future’ – Maura Herson

Maura Herson, Director of the MBA Program at MIT Sloan

From Business Vision

MIT has a worldwide reputation, and international students make up 34-40 percent of the Sloan School of Management’s MBA Programme.

MIT Sloan, based in Boston, values diversity and strives to provide a supportive environment for its global citizens. Its mission is to develop principled and innovative leaders who will improve the world, and enrich the learning experience of all students.

The MBA Programme conducts around 50 “Sloan on the Road” events each year to share admissions information and encourage qualified applicants, and its efforts – combined with MIT’s reputation – continue to pay off.

The US remains a popular destination for international graduate students. In the MBA Class of 2019, 48 percent of international students will be from Asia or the Middle East, 22 percent from South or Central America, 16 percent from Europe, nine percent from Canada and Mexico, three percent from Oceania, and two percent from Africa.

MIT has applications from India, China, Korea, Japan, South-east Asia and Central and South America, all regions where it has active alumni promotion.


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MBA diary: Making a difference – Sean Jennings

Sean Jennings, MIT Sloan EMBA '18

Sean Jennings, MIT Sloan EMBA ’18

From The Economist 

Sean Jennings, an Executive MBA student at the MIT Sloan School of Management, has gone back to school, decades after dropping out of college. “I don’t need to make any more money; I’m interested in making a difference.”

When people ask me why I—a college drop-out turned tech entrepreneur—decided to go back to school to get my Executive MBA, I tell them about my older brother, Michael. On New Year’s Eve in 1967, Michael and I both came down with a mysterious virus. We were babies at the time—he was two and I was one. No doctor could figure out the cause of it. Ultimately, I got better. But Michael was brain damaged.

I have always known how fortunate I am. I got to grow up and lead a healthy person’s life. Michael, who has the cognitive function of a toddler, spent his teens and twenties in an institution and now lives in a group home.

From a young age, I felt that my purpose was to take care of my brother. When I got older, I realised that would cost a lot of money. My goal was to attend the best college I could and then pursue the highest-paying career I could tolerate. Getting accepted to MIT on an Air Force scholarship was one of the proudest moments of my life. But two years into college, I got injured. The military released me on honourable medical discharge. I couldn’t afford tuition and didn’t want to take on overwhelming debt, so I dropped out. Read More »

Education is the kindling of a flame: How to reinvent the 21st-century university – Otto Scharmer

MIT Sloan Sr. Lecturer Otto Scharmer

MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Otto Scharmer

From Huffington Post

“Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.” This quote from Plutarch is as true today as it was two thousand years ago. Still, the misconception of education as a vessel-filling activity remains. In this column, I outline an idea that could reshape our universities while also prototyping new ways of addressing urgent societal challenges. The kindling of the flame that Plutarch talked about has never been more relevant than now.

Let’s start with 2017

Last week my column focused on 2017:

  • The year 2017 mirrored the epochal year 1917 by putting a new challenge in front of us: the challenge of vertical development.
  • By “vertical development” I mean the capacity to deal with disruptive change, which requires us to let go of the past and to let come the future, to shift our awareness from one state to another. In the language of tech: vertical development is about suspending your habit of installing yet another app and instead upgrading your entire operating system.
  • From that perspective we can interpret the current global surge of terrorism, fundamentalism, xenophobia, Trumpism, and autocracy as expressions of the same underlying phenomenon: the missing capacity as a society to respond to challenges in generative ways, by evolving ourselves “vertically,” by upgrading the way we listen and attend, the way we converse and think, and the way we organize and coordinate in the context of larger systems.

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